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Chopsticks pulling buckwheat soba from a plate of green vegetables.
The soba noodles at Kamonegi.
Kamonegi/Official

15 Essential Asian Noodle Destinations in Seattle

From soba to boat noodles and beyond

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The soba noodles at Kamonegi.
| Kamonegi/Official

In so many Asian cultures, noodles have positive meanings, ranging from longevity or general health to luck and fortune. Even without ascribing any particular significance to the starchy treat, noodles are the ultimate comfort food, and they're just plain wonderful. Sampling from many cuisines and noodle types, Eater has slurped its way across the Seattle area to make these recommendations for the most noteworthy Asian noodles in the area.

Note: Map points are ordered geographically from north to south, not ranked by preference. If you see anything we might have missed, send us a tip.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Talay Thai Restaurant

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4520 200th St SW
Lynnwood, WA 98036
(425) 670-1340
Visit Website

Talay Thai in Lynwood, WA, tallies up the standard phad fried noodle dishes, namely phad thai, phad kee mow, and phad see ew, but there are further options on the regular menu and even more on the “secret” Thai menu. Even diners who can’t read the latter list should take a leap and request the boat noodles. This is one of the only places in the area to find it in its tantalizing authentic form, rich with pork blood for a spicy, murky soup.

A view of a bowl of soup, with noodles and brown broth, topped with green herbs.
Boat noodle soup.
Jay Friedman for Eater

2. Hae-Nam Kalbi and Calamari

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15001 Aurora Ave N
Shoreline, WA 98133
(206) 367-7843

As at other Korean restaurants, diners with metal chopsticks eat noodles out of metal bowls. Those bowls contain bibim naengmyun, whose buckwheat noodles float in a spicy beef broth soup, topped with daikon kimchi, cucumber, beef slices, Asian pear, and half of a boiled egg. Also popular at this Shoreline, WA, destination are plates of chap chae, made with chewy potato-starch noodles that find their way into a number of Hae-Nam’s soups and stews.

Pork belly and squid soup, with glass noodles.
Pork belly and squid soup, with glass noodles.
Jay Friedman for Eater

3. Qian Noodle

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13510 Aurora Ave N
Seattle, WA 98133
(206) 407-6269

Qian Noodle, near the Asian Food Center on the north side of town, represents Seattle's expansion of Chinese food to other provincial cuisines. The recipes are from Guizhou province, showcasing dishes like lamb noodle soup with pickled greens. The house specialty is a sour soup option, which adds paste from stir-fried pickled chili peppers, tomatoes, rice vinegar, and garlic, making a noodle meal even more adventurous. (Sibling restaurant Qian Express Chinese Ramen House in Bellevue offers interesting noodle dishes for those on the Eastside.)

A bowl of soy sauce sour soup with pork and extra toppings on the side.
Soy sauce sour soup with pork.
Jay Friedman for Eater

4. Xi'an Noodles

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5259 University Way NE
Seattle, WA 98105
(206) 522-8888
Visit Website

Local students stomp in for the malatang (build-your-own hot pot), but even better are the noodles, especially the hot oil-seared biang-biang variety. These wide, hand-cut noodles are delightfully springy, and the simplicity of hot chili oil showcases their texture best, though meat toppings are also available — spicy cumin lamb is a notable option. There’s now a new Xi’an location at Westlake Center.

A closeup view of a bowl filled with lamb cumin noodles and herbs, pulled with chopsticks.
Lamb cumin noodles.
Gabe Guarente for Eater

5. Hokkaido Ramen Santouka

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2630 NE Village Ln
Seattle, WA 98105
(206) 524-4431
Visit Website

This Japanese import in U Village is the finest dedicated ramen shop in the Seattle area, with another location in Bellevue to satisfy Eastsiders. Santouka serves only tonkotsu broth, full of creamy, porky flavor due to its extended cooking time. The shio ramen has just the right level of salt seasoning to let the pork flavor of the broth shine, and it’s the only ramen served with pickled plum.

Shio ramen with tonkotsu broth, displayed with chopsticks.
Shio ramen with tonkotsu broth.
Jay Friedman for Eater

6. Kamonegi

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1054 N 39th St
Seattle, WA 98103

With Kamonegi, Seattle has a top quality restaurant that features fresh buckwheat soba noodles. Preparations run from basic (zaru: cold noodles with dipping sauce) to complex (Kamonegi’s namesake dish: soba with duck, leek, and a duck meatball), at a higher price point than other noodles on this Eater map, since even the flour is ground in-house. The Fremont spot also highlights seasonal tempura, which pairs perfectly with soba, including a classic tensoba combination of soba with shrimp.

Chopsticks pulling buckwheat soba from a plate of green vegetables.
Kamonegi specializes in handmade buckwheat soba noodles.
Kamonegi/Official

7. Revel

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513 Westlake Ave N
Seattle, WA 98109
(206) 547-2040
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While the Fremont location is closed temporarily for construction, Revel's South Lake Union pop-up will fulfill diners' desire for dumplings, Korean pancakes, rice bowls, and more. Perhaps the most popular noodle dish is the seaweed noodles with Dungeness crab, spicy red curry, and crème fraiche. It’s a mainstay on the menu, exemplifying the restaurant’s Asian fusion approach.

A bowl of noodles in a broth, topped with golden raisins and scallions.
Revel mixes up noodle offerings, depending on the season.
Jay Friedman for Eater

8. Kedai Makan

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1802 Bellevue Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

Chili pan mee is a staple at this popular Capitol Hill spot. The flavorful texture bomb features hand-cut wheat noodles topped with ground pork, fried anchovies, a poached egg, and green onions, along with mee sambal (dried chile) to spike the heat and a side of pork broth. Vegetarians can also indulge, thanks to the mushroom pan mee, and all diners should look for laksa and other Malaysian noodle specials that cycle through the menu.

Kedai Makan delivers Malaysian food, such as this chili pan mee dish with ground pork and dried anchovies.
Chili pan mee with ground pork and dried anchovies.
Jay Friedman for Eater

9. Ba Bar

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550 12th Ave
Seattle, WA 98122
(206) 328-2030
Visit Website

The bun bo hue and mì vịt tiem are excellent at this Vietnamese restaurant on First Hill, but this is the place to come for the highest quality pho in town. It’s a little more expensive, but you’ll taste the difference in the meat and broth. (Those who want a wider variety of meats — including tripe and tendon — in their pho should drive south on 12th to Pho So 1; for pho with noodles made in-house, try Dong Thap on 12th.)

A crepe lightly browned next to a bowl of pho, stuffed with noodles and dumplings.
A crepe and a bowl of pho.
Bill Addison for Eater

10. Mike's Noodle House

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418 Maynard Ave S
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 389-7099

Mike’s Noodle House in the CID may be the ultimate in Chinese comfort food. For a quick and inexpensive meal, bowls and noodles (the specialty is toothpick-thin egg noodles) are mighty satisfying, and can be combined with dumplings and/or wontons. Bring a friend to wait in line on weekends, adding a warm bowl of congee with various toppings and a youtiao (savory Chinese cruller) to the order.

mike’s noodle house by jay friedman dumpling map
Won tons with egg noodles.
Jay Friedman for Eater

11. Luosifen

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514 S King St
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 485-7189
Visit Website

Luosifen adds Guangxi Province as the newest regional representation of Chinese food scene in the CID. The namesake noodle soup features rice vermicelli noodles in a stock made from pork bones and river snails. Bowls include peanuts, wood ear mushrooms, bean curd, bamboo shoots, pickled long beans, green onions, and bok choy, with protein options such as crispy pork, brined egg, and pig’s feet.

A noodle bowl filled with crispy wontons, meat, peanuts, and vegetables.
Luosifen lets customers customize their toppings.
Jay Friedman for Eater

12. King Noodle

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615 S King St
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 748-9168

For those into customization, King Noodle is the place. For a set price, there’s a choice of soup base, noodles, and meat/vegetable toppings. The noodles themselves range from rice noodles (vermicelli to wide versions), udon, QQ noodles, and even instant — all worth a try.

A bowl of noodles with broth and meat.
Meat options at King Noodle include tripe, kidney, beef brisket, or free range chicken.
Jay Friedman for Eater

13. Gourmet Noodle Bowl

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707 8th Ave S
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 264-8899
Visit Website

The menu at this CID restaurant lists 31 noodle dishes, all with little explanation beyond a name. But from fried noodles to soup noodles, almost any choice is a winner. The shrimp spicy fried noodles are flavorful, with the noodles wide and chewy. And while the dishes are predominantly Chinese-style, don’t overlook the laksa curry noodle soup, with its delicious Malaysian influences.

A bowl of laksa curry.
Laksa curry.
Jay Friedman for Eater

14. Hoang Lan

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7119 Martin Luther King Jr Way S
Seattle, WA 98118
(206) 722-3876

The bún bò hue at this south Seattle restaurant is a carnivore’s delight, with pork sausage loaf, pork blood cakes, beef tendon, and a huge ham hock. The thick, round rice vermicelli noodles soak up a deep, hearty broth that’s full of flavor with fermented shrimp paste and loads of lemongrass. Further, brick-red annatto seeds impart passionate glow to the broth.

Bún bò hue with pork sausage loaf, pork blood cakes, beef tendon, and ham hock.
Bún bò hue with pork sausage loaf, pork blood cakes, beef tendon, and ham hock.
Jay Friedman for Eater

15. Dalat Quan

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9988 15th Ave SW suite i
Seattle, WA 98106
(206) 403-1620
Visit Website

This White Center restaurant features Da Lat-style special noodle soups, including various versions of nam vang noodle soup and a Da Lat version of bun bo hue that contains beef brisket. Best might be the mi quang, a hearty bowl with turmeric noodles, pork spare ribs, prawns, quail eggs, and a sesame rice cracker.

A bowl of mi quang, with turmeric noodles, pork spare ribs, prawns, and quail eggs.
Mi quang, with turmeric noodles, pork spare ribs, prawns, and quail eggs.
Jay Friedman for Eater

1. Talay Thai Restaurant

4520 200th St SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036
A view of a bowl of soup, with noodles and brown broth, topped with green herbs.
Boat noodle soup.
Jay Friedman for Eater

Talay Thai in Lynwood, WA, tallies up the standard phad fried noodle dishes, namely phad thai, phad kee mow, and phad see ew, but there are further options on the regular menu and even more on the “secret” Thai menu. Even diners who can’t read the latter list should take a leap and request the boat noodles. This is one of the only places in the area to find it in its tantalizing authentic form, rich with pork blood for a spicy, murky soup.

4520 200th St SW
Lynnwood, WA 98036

2. Hae-Nam Kalbi and Calamari

15001 Aurora Ave N, Shoreline, WA 98133
Pork belly and squid soup, with glass noodles.
Pork belly and squid soup, with glass noodles.
Jay Friedman for Eater

As at other Korean restaurants, diners with metal chopsticks eat noodles out of metal bowls. Those bowls contain bibim naengmyun, whose buckwheat noodles float in a spicy beef broth soup, topped with daikon kimchi, cucumber, beef slices, Asian pear, and half of a boiled egg. Also popular at this Shoreline, WA, destination are plates of chap chae, made with chewy potato-starch noodles that find their way into a number of Hae-Nam’s soups and stews.

15001 Aurora Ave N
Shoreline, WA 98133

3. Qian Noodle

13510 Aurora Ave N, Seattle, WA 98133
A bowl of soy sauce sour soup with pork and extra toppings on the side.
Soy sauce sour soup with pork.
Jay Friedman for Eater

Qian Noodle, near the Asian Food Center on the north side of town, represents Seattle's expansion of Chinese food to other provincial cuisines. The recipes are from Guizhou province, showcasing dishes like lamb noodle soup with pickled greens. The house specialty is a sour soup option, which adds paste from stir-fried pickled chili peppers, tomatoes, rice vinegar, and garlic, making a noodle meal even more adventurous. (Sibling restaurant Qian Express Chinese Ramen House in Bellevue offers interesting noodle dishes for those on the Eastside.)

13510 Aurora Ave N
Seattle, WA 98133

4. Xi'an Noodles

5259 University Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105
A closeup view of a bowl filled with lamb cumin noodles and herbs, pulled with chopsticks.
Lamb cumin noodles.
Gabe Guarente for Eater

Local students stomp in for the malatang (build-your-own hot pot), but even better are the noodles, especially the hot oil-seared biang-biang variety. These wide, hand-cut noodles are delightfully springy, and the simplicity of hot chili oil showcases their texture best, though meat toppings are also available — spicy cumin lamb is a notable option. There’s now a new Xi’an location at Westlake Center.

5259 University Way NE
Seattle, WA 98105

5. Hokkaido Ramen Santouka

2630 NE Village Ln, Seattle, WA 98105
Shio ramen with tonkotsu broth, displayed with chopsticks.
Shio ramen with tonkotsu broth.
Jay Friedman for Eater

This Japanese import in U Village is the finest dedicated ramen shop in the Seattle area, with another location in Bellevue to satisfy Eastsiders. Santouka serves only tonkotsu broth, full of creamy, porky flavor due to its extended cooking time. The shio ramen has just the right level of salt seasoning to let the pork flavor of the broth shine, and it’s the only ramen served with pickled plum.

2630 NE Village Ln
Seattle, WA 98105

6. Kamonegi

1054 N 39th St, Seattle, WA 98103
Chopsticks pulling buckwheat soba from a plate of green vegetables.
Kamonegi specializes in handmade buckwheat soba noodles.
Kamonegi/Official

With Kamonegi, Seattle has a top quality restaurant that features fresh buckwheat soba noodles. Preparations run from basic (zaru: cold noodles with dipping sauce) to complex (Kamonegi’s namesake dish: soba with duck, leek, and a duck meatball), at a higher price point than other noodles on this Eater map, since even the flour is ground in-house. The Fremont spot also highlights seasonal tempura, which pairs perfectly with soba, including a classic tensoba combination of soba with shrimp.

1054 N 39th St
Seattle, WA 98103

7. Revel

513 Westlake Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109
A bowl of noodles in a broth, topped with golden raisins and scallions.
Revel mixes up noodle offerings, depending on the season.
Jay Friedman for Eater

While the Fremont location is closed temporarily for construction, Revel's South Lake Union pop-up will fulfill diners' desire for dumplings, Korean pancakes, rice bowls, and more. Perhaps the most popular noodle dish is the seaweed noodles with Dungeness crab, spicy red curry, and crème fraiche. It’s a mainstay on the menu, exemplifying the restaurant’s Asian fusion approach.

513 Westlake Ave N
Seattle, WA 98109

8. Kedai Makan

1802 Bellevue Ave, Seattle, WA 98122
Kedai Makan delivers Malaysian food, such as this chili pan mee dish with ground pork and dried anchovies.
Chili pan mee with ground pork and dried anchovies.
Jay Friedman for Eater

Chili pan mee is a staple at this popular Capitol Hill spot. The flavorful texture bomb features hand-cut wheat noodles topped with ground pork, fried anchovies, a poached egg, and green onions, along with mee sambal (dried chile) to spike the heat and a side of pork broth. Vegetarians can also indulge, thanks to the mushroom pan mee, and all diners should look for laksa and other Malaysian noodle specials that cycle through the menu.

1802 Bellevue Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

9. Ba Bar

550 12th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122
A crepe lightly browned next to a bowl of pho, stuffed with noodles and dumplings.
A crepe and a bowl of pho.
Bill Addison for Eater

The bun bo hue and mì vịt tiem are excellent at this Vietnamese restaurant on First Hill, but this is the place to come for the highest quality pho in town. It’s a little more expensive, but you’ll taste the difference in the meat and broth. (Those who want a wider variety of meats — including tripe and tendon — in their pho should drive south on 12th to Pho So 1; for pho with noodles made in-house, try Dong Thap on 12th.)

550 12th Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

10. Mike's Noodle House

418 Maynard Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104
mike’s noodle house by jay friedman dumpling map
Won tons with egg noodles.
Jay Friedman for Eater

Mike’s Noodle House in the CID may be the ultimate in Chinese comfort food. For a quick and inexpensive meal, bowls and noodles (the specialty is toothpick-thin egg noodles) are mighty satisfying, and can be combined with dumplings and/or wontons. Bring a friend to wait in line on weekends, adding a warm bowl of congee with various toppings and a youtiao (savory Chinese cruller) to the order.

418 Maynard Ave S
Seattle, WA 98104

11. Luosifen

514 S King St, Seattle, WA 98104
A noodle bowl filled with crispy wontons, meat, peanuts, and vegetables.
Luosifen lets customers customize their toppings.
Jay Friedman for Eater

Luosifen adds Guangxi Province as the newest regional representation of Chinese food scene in the CID. The namesake noodle soup features rice vermicelli noodles in a stock made from pork bones and river snails. Bowls include peanuts, wood ear mushrooms, bean curd, bamboo shoots, pickled long beans, green onions, and bok choy, with protein options such as crispy pork, brined egg, and pig’s feet.

514 S King St
Seattle, WA 98104

12. King Noodle

615 S King St, Seattle, WA 98104
A bowl of noodles with broth and meat.
Meat options at King Noodle include tripe, kidney, beef brisket, or free range chicken.
Jay Friedman for Eater

For those into customization, King Noodle is the place. For a set price, there’s a choice of soup base, noodles, and meat/vegetable toppings. The noodles themselves range from rice noodles (vermicelli to wide versions), udon, QQ noodles, and even instant — all worth a try.

615 S King St
Seattle, WA 98104

13. Gourmet Noodle Bowl

707 8th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104
A bowl of laksa curry.
Laksa curry.
Jay Friedman for Eater

The menu at this CID restaurant lists 31 noodle dishes, all with little explanation beyond a name. But from fried noodles to soup noodles, almost any choice is a winner. The shrimp spicy fried noodles are flavorful, with the noodles wide and chewy. And while the dishes are predominantly Chinese-style, don’t overlook the laksa curry noodle soup, with its delicious Malaysian influences.

707 8th Ave S
Seattle, WA 98104

14. Hoang Lan

7119 Martin Luther King Jr Way S, Seattle, WA 98118
Bún bò hue with pork sausage loaf, pork blood cakes, beef tendon, and ham hock.
Bún bò hue with pork sausage loaf, pork blood cakes, beef tendon, and ham hock.
Jay Friedman for Eater

The bún bò hue at this south Seattle restaurant is a carnivore’s delight, with pork sausage loaf, pork blood cakes, beef tendon, and a huge ham hock. The thick, round rice vermicelli noodles soak up a deep, hearty broth that’s full of flavor with fermented shrimp paste and loads of lemongrass. Further, brick-red annatto seeds impart passionate glow to the broth.

7119 Martin Luther King Jr Way S
Seattle, WA 98118

15. Dalat Quan

9988 15th Ave SW suite i, Seattle, WA 98106
A bowl of mi quang, with turmeric noodles, pork spare ribs, prawns, and quail eggs.
Mi quang, with turmeric noodles, pork spare ribs, prawns, and quail eggs.
Jay Friedman for Eater

This White Center restaurant features Da Lat-style special noodle soups, including various versions of nam vang noodle soup and a Da Lat version of bun bo hue that contains beef brisket. Best might be the mi quang, a hearty bowl with turmeric noodles, pork spare ribs, prawns, quail eggs, and a sesame rice cracker.

9988 15th Ave SW suite i
Seattle, WA 98106

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