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A banh mi sandwich packed with sliced onions, jalapeños, pickled radish and carrot, and fried fish.
The basa fish banh mi at Tony’s bakery.
Jay Friedman

Where to Get Some Great Banh Mi in the Seattle Area

With grilled pork, cold cuts, fried fish, and more

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The basa fish banh mi at Tony’s bakery.
| Jay Friedman

Banh mi is simply one of the best comfort foods around — perfect as a snack or a full meal. The zesty, wallet-friendly Vietnamese classic starts with a simple baguette, cut lengthwise, then stuffed with satisfying fillings like chicken liver pate, sliced ham, grilled pork, and pickled vegetables. It also makes for a handy takeout or delivery option, and there are dozens of banh mi spots around the Seattle area. Here are some favorites.

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Yeh Yeh's

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The trickiest part of visiting this unassuming Lynnwood favorite might be navigating the parking lot, busy during peak business hours. Any hassle is well worth it, though, for the variety of banh mi that includes grilled meats (pork, chicken, and beef), tofu, ham, BBQ pork (or ham with BBQ pork), and what looks like a Northeastern U.S.-inspired section of the menu — brisket, pastrami, and Philly cheesesteak.

A closeup of the “BBQ/ham” special banh mi at Yeh Yeh’s
The “BBQ/ham” special at Yeh Yeh’s
Yeh Yeh’s

Seattle Deli

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The name reflects the initial location (in the Little Saigon neighborhood) of this beloved deli before it opened the now-remaining location in a Korean strip mall in Edmonds. While there are a few appetizers, entrees, and other Vietnamese treats, the bulk of the business focuses on excellent execution of four types of banh mi: chicken, cold cut with pate, tofu, and the signature grilled pork.

Rise and Shine Bakery

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Located on Highway 99 in Edmonds, Rise and Shine meets wholesale demand for crackly baguettes while also serving rotating specials like banh mi chao (“breakfast” skillet), bo ne (Vietnamese beef stew), and banh mi made from the baguettes. All the sandwiches, including the lemongrass-infused grilled beef, the tofu and mushroom, and grilled pork and fried egg, are freshly prepared.

A banh mi sandwich filled with meat, cilantro, and sliced cucumber.
 Grilled pork banh mi at Rise and Shine Bakery
Jay Friedman

Banh Town

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In addition to traditional banh mi like grilled pork, tofu, and dac biet (“pork special” with layers of porky cold cuts and pate), this Greenwood shop offers a couple of sandwiches with modern twists. One has corned beef that’s dipped in pho broth and then grilled, while the “phap” is a French chicken sandwich in which the chicken is braised in soy sauce and butter, then topped with grilled sweet onions, jalapenos, cilantro, and melted mozzarella cheese.

Two banh mi sandwiches on white parchment.
Banh Town’s corned beef and French chicken banh mi.
Jay Friedman

Lan Hue

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An import of a longstanding family business in Vietnam, this International District spot makes all its banh mi ingredients on site — from the bread down to the mayonnaise and bologna — and keeps the prices competitive. (It even offers one free sandwich with the purchase of five.) The banh mi are divided into three menus: Saigon (it’s here you’ll find fish in tomato sauce or shredded pork and skin), Seattle (featuring mostly grilled and BBQ meat), and Paris (with lots of pork and pate).

Saigon Deli

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Often confused with the nearby Saigon Vietnam Deli (also a good choice) on the same block of Jackson (and unrelated to Saigon Deli in the University District), Saigon Deli is a long-time favorite for banh mi and other Vietnamese deli delights. Portions of BBQ pork and roast chicken, for example, are generous. While the line can be long at lunchtime, the sandwich makers assemble banh mi orders rapidly, wrapping filled crusty baguettes in white paper, rolling on a rubber band, and placing each one in a plastic bag with a napkin in an orderly fashion.

A banh mi sandwich stuffed with grilled pork.
Saigon Deli’s grilled pork banh mi.
Jay Friedman

Chu Minh Tofu and Vegan Deli

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While many banh mi places offer tofu as a non-meat option, Chu Minh’s entire deli is vegan, including ten banh mi varieties. Choices include roasted “pork,” BBQ “duck,” lemongrass “chicken,” and sesame “beef.” (Don’t skip the unique “pork” skin sandwich!) All come slathered with chili sauce and vegan mayonnaise.

The vegan banh mi at Chu Minh Tofu and Vegan Deli.
Chu Minh Tofu and Vegan Deli offers vegan banh mi.
Chu Minh Tofu and Vegan Deli [Official Photo]

Billiard Hoang

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Having started as a pool hall selling Vietnamese sandwiches about 30 years ago, an expanded menu hasn’t taken away anything from the quality of the banh mi at Billiard Hoang. The BBQ pork and Vietnamese sausage banh mi is especially popular, and they are reasonably priced at $6 each (definitely add a lightly fluffed scrambled egg). Get them to go or to dine in — with an option to play pool as a bonus.

A banh mi sandwich in a red plastic boat tray.
BBQ pork and Vietnamese sausage banh mi at Billiard Hoang.
Jay Friedman

Tony's Bakery

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Tony’s Bakery is a kaleidoscopic affair crammed full of all kinds of colorful products, particularly the desserts. Even the walls and windows are overrun with splashy signs, including pictures of the ten banh mi that are always available. Take note of number 7: banh mi ca xa ot, made with basa fish (a type of catfish) that’s marinated in lemongrass and chili pepper, then battered and fried. The true secret to the sandwich’s success, however, is its super-flavorful smear of garlic-chive aioli. 

A banh mi sandwich packed with sliced onions, jalapeños, pickled radish and carrot, and fried fish.
The basa fish banh mi at Tony’s Bakery.
Jay Friedman

Q Bakery

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At Q Bakery, customers buy bread by the bagged bunch. The bakery also offers banh mi, with classic flavors like grilled or BBQ pork and shredded chicken. There are also some less-common options ones as well. Banh mi ca moi comes with tinned sardines in tomato sauce, the vegetables countering the sandwich’s fishiness. Even better is banh mi chao tom, with a shrimp paste “cake” that’s squishy and slightly salty, a perfect par to a fried egg.

A crumbled pork skin banh mi.
The pork skin banh mi at Q Bakery.
Jay Friedman

Le's Deli & Bakery

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Sitting on a corner at the Othello light rail station, Le’s Deli & Bakery provides indoor and outdoor seating and serves freshly made banh mi and other Vietnamese dishes. Traditional banh mi like the best-selling “house combo” with grilled pork and ham are neatly arranged with pickled carrots and daikon, jalapenos, cilantro, and a full-length slice of cucumber. Also available are po’ boy-like banh mi fillings, such as shrimp with banana peppers.

A banh mi sandwich with meat and a long piece of cucumber.
The house combo banh mi at Le’s Deli & Bakery.
Jay Friedman

Dalat Quan

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The banh mi at this White Center spot are grilled to order, so it’s best to dine in or to eat them as soon as possible when ordering to-go. For the dac biet, the cold cuts are sliced in-house and are thicker for a meatier experience. The grilled pork is a little non-traditional but still delicious with vinegary pepperoncinis to supplement the jalapenos, plus red onions and cooling slices of tomato.

Two halves of a grilled pork banh mi sandwich.
DaLat Quan’s banh mi with pork is grilled upon ordering.
Jay Friedman

Yeh Yeh's

The trickiest part of visiting this unassuming Lynnwood favorite might be navigating the parking lot, busy during peak business hours. Any hassle is well worth it, though, for the variety of banh mi that includes grilled meats (pork, chicken, and beef), tofu, ham, BBQ pork (or ham with BBQ pork), and what looks like a Northeastern U.S.-inspired section of the menu — brisket, pastrami, and Philly cheesesteak.

A closeup of the “BBQ/ham” special banh mi at Yeh Yeh’s
The “BBQ/ham” special at Yeh Yeh’s
Yeh Yeh’s

Seattle Deli

The name reflects the initial location (in the Little Saigon neighborhood) of this beloved deli before it opened the now-remaining location in a Korean strip mall in Edmonds. While there are a few appetizers, entrees, and other Vietnamese treats, the bulk of the business focuses on excellent execution of four types of banh mi: chicken, cold cut with pate, tofu, and the signature grilled pork.

Rise and Shine Bakery

Located on Highway 99 in Edmonds, Rise and Shine meets wholesale demand for crackly baguettes while also serving rotating specials like banh mi chao (“breakfast” skillet), bo ne (Vietnamese beef stew), and banh mi made from the baguettes. All the sandwiches, including the lemongrass-infused grilled beef, the tofu and mushroom, and grilled pork and fried egg, are freshly prepared.

A banh mi sandwich filled with meat, cilantro, and sliced cucumber.
 Grilled pork banh mi at Rise and Shine Bakery
Jay Friedman

Banh Town

In addition to traditional banh mi like grilled pork, tofu, and dac biet (“pork special” with layers of porky cold cuts and pate), this Greenwood shop offers a couple of sandwiches with modern twists. One has corned beef that’s dipped in pho broth and then grilled, while the “phap” is a French chicken sandwich in which the chicken is braised in soy sauce and butter, then topped with grilled sweet onions, jalapenos, cilantro, and melted mozzarella cheese.

Two banh mi sandwiches on white parchment.
Banh Town’s corned beef and French chicken banh mi.
Jay Friedman

Lan Hue

An import of a longstanding family business in Vietnam, this International District spot makes all its banh mi ingredients on site — from the bread down to the mayonnaise and bologna — and keeps the prices competitive. (It even offers one free sandwich with the purchase of five.) The banh mi are divided into three menus: Saigon (it’s here you’ll find fish in tomato sauce or shredded pork and skin), Seattle (featuring mostly grilled and BBQ meat), and Paris (with lots of pork and pate).

Saigon Deli

Often confused with the nearby Saigon Vietnam Deli (also a good choice) on the same block of Jackson (and unrelated to Saigon Deli in the University District), Saigon Deli is a long-time favorite for banh mi and other Vietnamese deli delights. Portions of BBQ pork and roast chicken, for example, are generous. While the line can be long at lunchtime, the sandwich makers assemble banh mi orders rapidly, wrapping filled crusty baguettes in white paper, rolling on a rubber band, and placing each one in a plastic bag with a napkin in an orderly fashion.

A banh mi sandwich stuffed with grilled pork.
Saigon Deli’s grilled pork banh mi.
Jay Friedman

Chu Minh Tofu and Vegan Deli

While many banh mi places offer tofu as a non-meat option, Chu Minh’s entire deli is vegan, including ten banh mi varieties. Choices include roasted “pork,” BBQ “duck,” lemongrass “chicken,” and sesame “beef.” (Don’t skip the unique “pork” skin sandwich!) All come slathered with chili sauce and vegan mayonnaise.

The vegan banh mi at Chu Minh Tofu and Vegan Deli.
Chu Minh Tofu and Vegan Deli offers vegan banh mi.
Chu Minh Tofu and Vegan Deli [Official Photo]

Billiard Hoang

Having started as a pool hall selling Vietnamese sandwiches about 30 years ago, an expanded menu hasn’t taken away anything from the quality of the banh mi at Billiard Hoang. The BBQ pork and Vietnamese sausage banh mi is especially popular, and they are reasonably priced at $6 each (definitely add a lightly fluffed scrambled egg). Get them to go or to dine in — with an option to play pool as a bonus.

A banh mi sandwich in a red plastic boat tray.
BBQ pork and Vietnamese sausage banh mi at Billiard Hoang.
Jay Friedman

Tony's Bakery

Tony’s Bakery is a kaleidoscopic affair crammed full of all kinds of colorful products, particularly the desserts. Even the walls and windows are overrun with splashy signs, including pictures of the ten banh mi that are always available. Take note of number 7: banh mi ca xa ot, made with basa fish (a type of catfish) that’s marinated in lemongrass and chili pepper, then battered and fried. The true secret to the sandwich’s success, however, is its super-flavorful smear of garlic-chive aioli. 

A banh mi sandwich packed with sliced onions, jalapeños, pickled radish and carrot, and fried fish.
The basa fish banh mi at Tony’s Bakery.
Jay Friedman

Q Bakery

At Q Bakery, customers buy bread by the bagged bunch. The bakery also offers banh mi, with classic flavors like grilled or BBQ pork and shredded chicken. There are also some less-common options ones as well. Banh mi ca moi comes with tinned sardines in tomato sauce, the vegetables countering the sandwich’s fishiness. Even better is banh mi chao tom, with a shrimp paste “cake” that’s squishy and slightly salty, a perfect par to a fried egg.

A crumbled pork skin banh mi.
The pork skin banh mi at Q Bakery.
Jay Friedman

Le's Deli & Bakery

Sitting on a corner at the Othello light rail station, Le’s Deli & Bakery provides indoor and outdoor seating and serves freshly made banh mi and other Vietnamese dishes. Traditional banh mi like the best-selling “house combo” with grilled pork and ham are neatly arranged with pickled carrots and daikon, jalapenos, cilantro, and a full-length slice of cucumber. Also available are po’ boy-like banh mi fillings, such as shrimp with banana peppers.

A banh mi sandwich with meat and a long piece of cucumber.
The house combo banh mi at Le’s Deli & Bakery.
Jay Friedman

Dalat Quan

The banh mi at this White Center spot are grilled to order, so it’s best to dine in or to eat them as soon as possible when ordering to-go. For the dac biet, the cold cuts are sliced in-house and are thicker for a meatier experience. The grilled pork is a little non-traditional but still delicious with vinegary pepperoncinis to supplement the jalapenos, plus red onions and cooling slices of tomato.

Two halves of a grilled pork banh mi sandwich.
DaLat Quan’s banh mi with pork is grilled upon ordering.
Jay Friedman

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