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A plate of sheng jian bao at Xiao Chi Jie topped with black sesame seeds.
Sheng jian bao at Xiao Chi Jie.
Jay Friedman for Eater

10 Top Spots for Asian Dumplings in the Seattle Area

From pot-stickers to sheng jian bao, and beyond

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Sheng jian bao at Xiao Chi Jie.
| Jay Friedman for Eater

Whether steamed, boiled, pan-fried, or even deep-fried, dumplings are an international sensation. Seattle, with its many Asian influences, is lucky enough to have a wealth of the doughy delights, hailing from China, Vietnam, and Japan, even Tibet. Eater Seattle has dipped and devoured its fair share of dumplings to present the pick of the city’s top shops.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Little Ting's Dumplings

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14411 Greenwood Ave N
Seattle, WA 98133
(206) 363-3866
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Little Ting’s sets the standard for boiled dumplings in the Seattle area, but the pan-fried pot-stickers are great as well. The dumplings here (and at the Bellevue location) come in many varieties, from pork and fennel to chive and scallop to sea cucumber and pork. There are also occasional specials, such as sea urchin dumplings.

A plate full of boiled dumplings from Little Ting’s.
Little Ting’s is known for its boiled dumplings.
Jay Friedman for Eater

2. Din Tai Fung

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2615 NE 46th St
Seattle, WA 98105
(206) 525-0958
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Fans flock to this well-known chain for baskets of xiao long bao (called “Juicy Dumplings” on the menu). They’re fantastic, even if they lack the tell-tale droop and hot broth found at DTF’s home in Taiwan. The shrimp and pork shao mai, which carry the combined flavor of land and sea, are another absolutely gorgeous choice.

A basket of dumplings from Din Tai Fung in Seattle.
Din Tai Fung has multiple locations in the Seattle area.
Jay Friedman for Eater

3. Revel

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513 Westlake Ave N
Seattle, WA 98109
(206) 547-2040
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Revel’s dumpling menu changes frequently (past versions have included sweet corn with black bean and coconut, as well as shrimp and bacon with pickled ginger and cilantro). The mainstay short rib dumplings with pickled shallot and scallion are recommended, dipped into any of the four sauces in the restaurant's terrific condiment tray.

A plate of red-tinged short rib dumplings topped with pickled shallot and scallion.
Short rib dumplings.
Jay Friedman for Eater

4. Teinei

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5538, 1256 Republican St
Seattle, WA 98109
(206) 420-4500
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Japan loves its gyoza (pot-stickers with pork, garlic, and usually cabbage), and finding a favorite is a matter of personal preference. Teinei serves them two to a plate, but they’re big ones that are crispy on the outside and light on the inside. (Their version mixes ground chicken with pork.) They’re the perfect accompaniment to a bowl or ramen, perhaps chased by a beer.

Two long and crispy gyoza on a plate at Teinei.
Long and crispy gyoza.
Jay Friedman for Eater

5. Annapurna Cafe

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1833 Broadway
Seattle, WA 98122
(206) 320-7770
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Annapurna, which serves Tibetan, Nepalese, and Indian food, is the place to go for spinach momo. These Tibetan-style dumplings are vegan, filled with spinach and aromatic spices. Best of all, they come with peanut (slightly spicy), sesame (slightly sweet), and tomato (slightly tangy) chutney sauces, offering a variety of flavors to enjoy.

A metal plate of spinach momo dumplings with a variety of chutney sauces.
Spinach momo.
Jay Friedman for Eater

6. Xiao Chi Jie

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278 106th Ave NE
Bellevue, WA 98004
(425) 598-2184
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Crowds come to the counter of Xiao Chi Jie for the fried soup dumplings known as sheng jian bao. Massive pans facilitate the production of large numbers of these juicy pork buns, crisped on one side and topped with black sesame seeds and a sprinkling of green onions. Wonderful but certainly messy, diners eat these explosive dumplings at their own risk.

A variety of sheng jian bao, topped with black sesame seeds, at Xiao Chi Jie.
Sheng jian bao.
Jay Friedman for Eater

7. Ba Bar

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550 12th Ave
Seattle, WA 98122
(206) 328-2030
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The Hue dumplings known as banh bot loc chay are available during weekday dinners at Ba Bar. Made from tapioca, they have delicious mung bean filling and come with spicy soy vinaigrette.

A plate of Hue dumplings (made from tapioca) on a white plate at Ba Bar.
Hue dumplings.
Jay Friedman for Eater

8. Szechuan Noodle Bowl

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420 8th Ave S
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 623-4198
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The brightly lit Szechuan Noodle Bowl might be best known for its big bowls of soup, but there’s also a solid selection of dumplings on hand. The top pick? Pot-stickers. They’ve got the basic filling of ground pork, napa cabbage, ginger, and garlic, but they’re unusually long (three-biters) and perfectly pan-fried.

A plate of long, pan-fried pot-stickers at Szechuan Noodle Bowl.
Pot-stickers filled with ground pork.
Jay Friedman for Eater

9. Mike's Noodle House

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418 Maynard Ave S
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 389-7099
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There’s a good reason why so many people have been squeezing into Mike’s Noodle House for all these years: The restaurant's wonton and sui-kau soup offers the boldest broth in the area, the perfect bath for the high quality dumplings.

A bowl of wonton and sui-kau soup at Mike’s Noodle House.
Wonton and sui-kau soup.
Jay Friedman for Eater

10. Gourmet Noodle Bowl

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707 8th Ave S
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 264-8899
Visit Website

They might not technically be dumplings, but the spicy wontons at Gourmet Noodle Bowl are delicate, wonderful, and close enough to make an exception. These beauties are filled with shrimp and pork, and bathe in a flavorful chili sauce — a perfect side to a choice of noodle bowls.

A bowl of spicy wontons with chopsticks and a dipping sauce on the side.
Spicy wontons.
Jay Friedman for Eater

1. Little Ting's Dumplings

14411 Greenwood Ave N, Seattle, WA 98133
A plate full of boiled dumplings from Little Ting’s.
Little Ting’s is known for its boiled dumplings.
Jay Friedman for Eater

Little Ting’s sets the standard for boiled dumplings in the Seattle area, but the pan-fried pot-stickers are great as well. The dumplings here (and at the Bellevue location) come in many varieties, from pork and fennel to chive and scallop to sea cucumber and pork. There are also occasional specials, such as sea urchin dumplings.

14411 Greenwood Ave N
Seattle, WA 98133

2. Din Tai Fung

2615 NE 46th St, Seattle, WA 98105
A basket of dumplings from Din Tai Fung in Seattle.
Din Tai Fung has multiple locations in the Seattle area.
Jay Friedman for Eater

Fans flock to this well-known chain for baskets of xiao long bao (called “Juicy Dumplings” on the menu). They’re fantastic, even if they lack the tell-tale droop and hot broth found at DTF’s home in Taiwan. The shrimp and pork shao mai, which carry the combined flavor of land and sea, are another absolutely gorgeous choice.

2615 NE 46th St
Seattle, WA 98105

3. Revel

513 Westlake Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109
A plate of red-tinged short rib dumplings topped with pickled shallot and scallion.
Short rib dumplings.
Jay Friedman for Eater

Revel’s dumpling menu changes frequently (past versions have included sweet corn with black bean and coconut, as well as shrimp and bacon with pickled ginger and cilantro). The mainstay short rib dumplings with pickled shallot and scallion are recommended, dipped into any of the four sauces in the restaurant's terrific condiment tray.

513 Westlake Ave N
Seattle, WA 98109

4. Teinei

5538, 1256 Republican St, Seattle, WA 98109
Two long and crispy gyoza on a plate at Teinei.
Long and crispy gyoza.
Jay Friedman for Eater

Japan loves its gyoza (pot-stickers with pork, garlic, and usually cabbage), and finding a favorite is a matter of personal preference. Teinei serves them two to a plate, but they’re big ones that are crispy on the outside and light on the inside. (Their version mixes ground chicken with pork.) They’re the perfect accompaniment to a bowl or ramen, perhaps chased by a beer.

5538, 1256 Republican St
Seattle, WA 98109

5. Annapurna Cafe

1833 Broadway, Seattle, WA 98122
A metal plate of spinach momo dumplings with a variety of chutney sauces.
Spinach momo.
Jay Friedman for Eater

Annapurna, which serves Tibetan, Nepalese, and Indian food, is the place to go for spinach momo. These Tibetan-style dumplings are vegan, filled with spinach and aromatic spices. Best of all, they come with peanut (slightly spicy), sesame (slightly sweet), and tomato (slightly tangy) chutney sauces, offering a variety of flavors to enjoy.

1833 Broadway
Seattle, WA 98122

6. Xiao Chi Jie

278 106th Ave NE, Bellevue, WA 98004
A variety of sheng jian bao, topped with black sesame seeds, at Xiao Chi Jie.
Sheng jian bao.
Jay Friedman for Eater

Crowds come to the counter of Xiao Chi Jie for the fried soup dumplings known as sheng jian bao. Massive pans facilitate the production of large numbers of these juicy pork buns, crisped on one side and topped with black sesame seeds and a sprinkling of green onions. Wonderful but certainly messy, diners eat these explosive dumplings at their own risk.

278 106th Ave NE
Bellevue, WA 98004

7. Ba Bar

550 12th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122
A plate of Hue dumplings (made from tapioca) on a white plate at Ba Bar.
Hue dumplings.
Jay Friedman for Eater

The Hue dumplings known as banh bot loc chay are available during weekday dinners at Ba Bar. Made from tapioca, they have delicious mung bean filling and come with spicy soy vinaigrette.

550 12th Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

8. Szechuan Noodle Bowl

420 8th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104
A plate of long, pan-fried pot-stickers at Szechuan Noodle Bowl.
Pot-stickers filled with ground pork.
Jay Friedman for Eater

The brightly lit Szechuan Noodle Bowl might be best known for its big bowls of soup, but there’s also a solid selection of dumplings on hand. The top pick? Pot-stickers. They’ve got the basic filling of ground pork, napa cabbage, ginger, and garlic, but they’re unusually long (three-biters) and perfectly pan-fried.

420 8th Ave S
Seattle, WA 98104

9. Mike's Noodle House

418 Maynard Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104
A bowl of wonton and sui-kau soup at Mike’s Noodle House.
Wonton and sui-kau soup.
Jay Friedman for Eater

There’s a good reason why so many people have been squeezing into Mike’s Noodle House for all these years: The restaurant's wonton and sui-kau soup offers the boldest broth in the area, the perfect bath for the high quality dumplings.

418 Maynard Ave S
Seattle, WA 98104

10. Gourmet Noodle Bowl

707 8th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104
A bowl of spicy wontons with chopsticks and a dipping sauce on the side.
Spicy wontons.
Jay Friedman for Eater

They might not technically be dumplings, but the spicy wontons at Gourmet Noodle Bowl are delicate, wonderful, and close enough to make an exception. These beauties are filled with shrimp and pork, and bathe in a flavorful chili sauce — a perfect side to a choice of noodle bowls.

707 8th Ave S
Seattle, WA 98104

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