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A bamboo steamer tray full of xiao long bao dumplings.
The xiao long bao at Mount & Bao in Lake City.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

10 Spots for Superb Asian Dumplings in the Seattle Area

With juicy xiao long bao, pot-stickers, mandu, and more

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The xiao long bao at Mount & Bao in Lake City.
| Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Whether steamed, boiled, pan-fried, or even deep-fried, dumplings are an international sensation. Seattle, with its many Asian influences, is lucky enough to have a wealth of dumplings hailing from China, Taiwan, Vietnam, Japan, and even Tibet. Here are 10 of the top dumplings in the Seattle area, with juicy xiao long bao, crispy pot-stickers, sheng jian bao, and more

Know of a spot that we should know about? Send us a tip at seattle@eater.com. As usual, this list is not ranked; it’s organized geographically.

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Mount&Bao

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That the dumplings at Mount & Bao are delightful comes as no surprise, given the overlap in ownership with Little Ting’s Dumplings in Greenwood. Best steamed, but also available pan-fried, the dumplings come in many varieties, from pork and fennel to beef and onion to tofu and carrot. This Lake City shop also offers delicate xiao long bao and sheng jian bao to boot.

A bamboo steamer tray full of xiao long bao dumplings.
The xiao long bao at Mount & Bao.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Din Tai Fung

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Fans flock to this well-known chain for baskets of xiao long bao made with Kurobata pork. They’re fantastic, even if they lack the tell-tale droop and hot broth found at DTF’s home in Taiwan. The shrimp and pork shao mai, which carry the combined flavor of land and sea, are another gorgeous choice amidst a wider selection of dumplings, buns, and wontons.

You never know what kind of dumplings you might see on Revel’s menu (breakfast sausage wontons and shrimp and bacon wontons appear on occasion, while dumplings with sweet corn, black bean and coconut were a previous favorite), but the mainstay has been short rib wontons with chili oil and fried garlic. The meat is seasoned and ground in-house, and the chili oil is seductively smoky with the garlic nice and crunchy.

Annapurna Cafe

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Annapurna, which serves Tibetan, Nepalese, and Indian food, is the place to go for spinach momo. These Tibetan-style dumplings are vegan, filled with spinach and aromatic spices. Best of all, they come with peanut (slightly spicy), sesame (slightly sweet), and tomato (slightly tangy) chutney sauces, offering a variety of flavors to enjoy. You can also find tensing momo, a dumpling with a chicken filling.

A metal plate of spinach momo dumplings with a variety of chutney sauces.
The spinach momos from Annapurna Cafe.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Xiao Chi Jie

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Crowds come to the counter of Xiao Chi Jie for the fried soup dumplings known as sheng jian bao. Massive pans facilitate the production of large numbers of these juicy pork buns, crisped on one side and topped with black sesame seeds and a sprinkling of green onions. Wonderful but certainly messy, diners eat these explosive dumplings at their own risk. (The other main menu item is xiao long bao, but the sheng jian bao are the better bet.)

A variety of sheng jian bao, topped with black sesame seeds, at Xiao Chi Jie.
The sheng jian bao at Xiao Chi Jie.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Hương Bình Restaurant

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The Hue dumplings known as banh bot loc are made from tapioca starch, filled with shrimp and pork, and garnished with ground shrimp and green onions. Translucent and chewy, dip them into Huong Binh’s savory nuoc cham sauce that’s sweet, spicy, and addictively pungent. (If you want to grab and go, you can also find banh bat loc at the Vietnamese delis close to Huong Binh in Little Saigon.)

Translucent tapioca dumplings garnished with ground shrimp and green onions.
The bahn bot loc at Huong Binh.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Szechuan Noodle Bowl

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The brightly lit Szechuan Noodle Bowl might be best known for its big bowls of soup, but there’s also a solid selection of dumplings on hand. The top pick? Pot-stickers. They’ve got the basic filling of ground pork, napa cabbage, ginger, and garlic, but they’re unusually long (three-biters) and perfectly pan-fried.

A plate of long, pan-fried pot-stickers at Szechuan Noodle Bowl.
Pot-stickers filled with ground pork from Szechuan Noodle Bowl.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Mike's Noodle House

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There’s a good reason why so many people have been squeezing into Mike’s Noodle House for all these years: The restaurant's wonton and sui-kau soup offers the boldest broth in the area, the perfect bath for the high quality dumplings. Even better, the combination wonton and sui-kau soup gets you both dumplings and noodles in the same bowl.

A bowl of wonton and sui-kau soup at Mike’s Noodle House.
The wonton and sui-kau soup at Mike’s Noodle House.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Momosan Seattle

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On the menu, the description for Momosan’s pork gyoza reads simply: pan-fried pork dumplings served with scallion ginger. But these gyoza are pretty special. They come sizzling in a small Staub cast-iron rectangular pan, the captivating brown color indicating perfection in searing to a crisp texture. You can get soy sauce, but you might not need it, as the scallion-ginger topping is that good.

MyungIn Dumplings

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You can find mandu at many of the Korean restaurants in the Seattle area, but you’ll find a slew of different dumplings at Korean-Chinese MyungIn Dumplings in Federal Way. There are a variety of steamed and fried dumplings, including a spicy steam roll dumpling with pork and shrimp, but the specialty of the house are the “King” steamed dumplings filled with pork and vegetables or the more tantalizing pork and kimchi.

Mount&Bao

That the dumplings at Mount & Bao are delightful comes as no surprise, given the overlap in ownership with Little Ting’s Dumplings in Greenwood. Best steamed, but also available pan-fried, the dumplings come in many varieties, from pork and fennel to beef and onion to tofu and carrot. This Lake City shop also offers delicate xiao long bao and sheng jian bao to boot.

A bamboo steamer tray full of xiao long bao dumplings.
The xiao long bao at Mount & Bao.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Din Tai Fung

Fans flock to this well-known chain for baskets of xiao long bao made with Kurobata pork. They’re fantastic, even if they lack the tell-tale droop and hot broth found at DTF’s home in Taiwan. The shrimp and pork shao mai, which carry the combined flavor of land and sea, are another gorgeous choice amidst a wider selection of dumplings, buns, and wontons.

Revel

You never know what kind of dumplings you might see on Revel’s menu (breakfast sausage wontons and shrimp and bacon wontons appear on occasion, while dumplings with sweet corn, black bean and coconut were a previous favorite), but the mainstay has been short rib wontons with chili oil and fried garlic. The meat is seasoned and ground in-house, and the chili oil is seductively smoky with the garlic nice and crunchy.

Annapurna Cafe

Annapurna, which serves Tibetan, Nepalese, and Indian food, is the place to go for spinach momo. These Tibetan-style dumplings are vegan, filled with spinach and aromatic spices. Best of all, they come with peanut (slightly spicy), sesame (slightly sweet), and tomato (slightly tangy) chutney sauces, offering a variety of flavors to enjoy. You can also find tensing momo, a dumpling with a chicken filling.

A metal plate of spinach momo dumplings with a variety of chutney sauces.
The spinach momos from Annapurna Cafe.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Xiao Chi Jie

Crowds come to the counter of Xiao Chi Jie for the fried soup dumplings known as sheng jian bao. Massive pans facilitate the production of large numbers of these juicy pork buns, crisped on one side and topped with black sesame seeds and a sprinkling of green onions. Wonderful but certainly messy, diners eat these explosive dumplings at their own risk. (The other main menu item is xiao long bao, but the sheng jian bao are the better bet.)

A variety of sheng jian bao, topped with black sesame seeds, at Xiao Chi Jie.
The sheng jian bao at Xiao Chi Jie.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Hương Bình Restaurant

The Hue dumplings known as banh bot loc are made from tapioca starch, filled with shrimp and pork, and garnished with ground shrimp and green onions. Translucent and chewy, dip them into Huong Binh’s savory nuoc cham sauce that’s sweet, spicy, and addictively pungent. (If you want to grab and go, you can also find banh bat loc at the Vietnamese delis close to Huong Binh in Little Saigon.)

Translucent tapioca dumplings garnished with ground shrimp and green onions.
The bahn bot loc at Huong Binh.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Szechuan Noodle Bowl

The brightly lit Szechuan Noodle Bowl might be best known for its big bowls of soup, but there’s also a solid selection of dumplings on hand. The top pick? Pot-stickers. They’ve got the basic filling of ground pork, napa cabbage, ginger, and garlic, but they’re unusually long (three-biters) and perfectly pan-fried.

A plate of long, pan-fried pot-stickers at Szechuan Noodle Bowl.
Pot-stickers filled with ground pork from Szechuan Noodle Bowl.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Mike's Noodle House

There’s a good reason why so many people have been squeezing into Mike’s Noodle House for all these years: The restaurant's wonton and sui-kau soup offers the boldest broth in the area, the perfect bath for the high quality dumplings. Even better, the combination wonton and sui-kau soup gets you both dumplings and noodles in the same bowl.

A bowl of wonton and sui-kau soup at Mike’s Noodle House.
The wonton and sui-kau soup at Mike’s Noodle House.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Momosan Seattle

On the menu, the description for Momosan’s pork gyoza reads simply: pan-fried pork dumplings served with scallion ginger. But these gyoza are pretty special. They come sizzling in a small Staub cast-iron rectangular pan, the captivating brown color indicating perfection in searing to a crisp texture. You can get soy sauce, but you might not need it, as the scallion-ginger topping is that good.

MyungIn Dumplings

You can find mandu at many of the Korean restaurants in the Seattle area, but you’ll find a slew of different dumplings at Korean-Chinese MyungIn Dumplings in Federal Way. There are a variety of steamed and fried dumplings, including a spicy steam roll dumpling with pork and shrimp, but the specialty of the house are the “King” steamed dumplings filled with pork and vegetables or the more tantalizing pork and kimchi.

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