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A 12-inch piece of fried cod with thick-cut fries, tartar sauce, and mushy pieces, served on a piece of newspaper.
The fish and chips at Bainbridge Island’s Proper Fish looks exactly like what’s served at an English seaside pub.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Where to Get Knockout Fish and Chips in the Seattle Area

With traditional English-style battered cod, crispy panko-crusted fish, and more

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The fish and chips at Bainbridge Island’s Proper Fish looks exactly like what’s served at an English seaside pub.
| Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Fish and chips hasn’t been a trendy dish for centuries, but it holds a special place in the hearts of Seattlites; the oldest seafood icons in the city built their names on the dish, coupling themselves with trips to Alki Beach and the Seattle Aquarium. As the city’s makeup grew more complex, so did the variations on offer.

Today, some of the best spots stray far away from traditional English style. The cornmeal-fried catfish at Jackson’s Catfish Corner and panko-covered cod at Marination Ma Kai, for example, rank among the best fried fish in the city. But for fans of the classic puffy beer batter, there are a number of excellent English renditions as well.

It’s also no coincidence that some of the most fryable fish are found in Pacific Northwest waters. Cod, halibut, and even salmon can be the star of the show. The chefs at these eight Seattle restaurants deliver the chips and dips to match, resulting in a lovely basket for any time of year.

Know of a spot that should be on our radar? Send us a tip by emailing seattle@eater.com. As usual, this list is not ranked; it’s organized geographically.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Jackson’s Catfish Corner

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Terrell Jackson gave the city a reason to celebrate when he brought his family’s fried catfish back to the Central District in 2021. The small strips, coated in a paper-thin cornmeal breading, are complemented by the house-made spicy tartar sauce and Louisiana-style hot sauce. It’s also not a bad call to swap the “chips” for a handful of the restaurant’s crispy hush puppies.

A paper boat full of pieces of fried catfish.
The fried catfish at Jackson’s Catfish Corner.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Proper Fish

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The fish and chips at Bainbridge Island’s Proper Fish looks exactly like what’s served at an English seaside pub: a twelve-inch length of cod, served with thick-cut chips and a dollop of mushy peas. The only thing missing is the waterfront view. Luckily, the crispy batter will survive the five-minute walk down to the Waterfront Park, where diners can indulge in one of Seattle’s most traditional takes on the dish.

One big fried piece of fish with some fries.
The fish and chips at Proper Fish.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Marination Ma Kai

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For fish and chips at Alki Beach, try skipping the classic spots on the main strip to stop by Hawaiian restaurant Marination Ma Kai. The breading has layers upon layers of crispy panko, and signature sauces like the miso ginger tartar aren’t found anywhere else in the city. Patrons can avoid the line, which is guaranteed to be out the door on a sunny day, by ordering ahead online.

Two pieces of panko-crusted fish with fries.
The panko-crusted fish and chips at Marination Ma Kai.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Burien Fish House

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At Burien Fish House, diners choose their own fish and chips adventures. The menu allows choices for the type of fish (halibut, salmon, cod, or shrimp), the number of pieces, the type of breading or batter, and it offers selections of ten sauces (including three housemade tartars). For those who are decision-averse, the beer-battered halibut and a side of jalapeno tartar is an excellent choice.

Three pieces of beer-battered halibut with fries in a paper takeout container.
The beer-battered halibut at Burien Fish House.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Bait Shop

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Capitol Hill’s Bait Shop boasts that its fries are world-famous, and they might actually be deserving of that title. Each fry has a seemingly-impossible contrast of crunchy outside to pillowy potato inside. The two sizable pieces of fish are heavily beer-battered — excellent alongside a pint at the bar — but don’t survive a trip home quite as well.

Two pieces of beer-battered fish and fries.
The beer-battered fish and chips at Bait Shop.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Old Stove Brewing

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In lieu of the “been here for a hundred years” vibe throughout the rest of Pike Place Market, Old Stove offers views of the Puget Sound and a creative beer list. The fish and chips, battered using the brewery’s Belgian Blonde ale, is a wonderful rendition of the English style.

Three pieces of beer-battered fish and fries laid out on a newspaper.
The English-style fish and chips at Old Stove Brewing.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Pacific Inn Pub

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Pacific Inn’s secretly-spiced, panko-breaded fish and chips got Uncle Tony’s blessing in a 2017 Seattle episode of “Parts Unknown”. Most orders soak up late-night pitchers in the cozy barroom, but they also make an affordable lunch enjoyed on the patio.

Two pieces of panko-crusted fish with fries, coleslaw, and tartar sauce.
The panko-breaded fish and chips at Pacific Inn Pub.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Macleod’s Scottish Pub

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Edinburgh native Alan MacLeod opened Macleod’s in 2011, delivering single-malt Scotch and Scottish fare to the heart of Ballard. The fish and chips now headlines the concise menu, which includes a happy hour portion available from 4-6pm. The bright green mushy peas are a highlight.

One large piece of heavily battered fish with fries and tartar sauce.
The fish and chips at Macleo’ds Scottish Pub.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Jackson’s Catfish Corner

A paper boat full of pieces of fried catfish.
The fried catfish at Jackson’s Catfish Corner.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Terrell Jackson gave the city a reason to celebrate when he brought his family’s fried catfish back to the Central District in 2021. The small strips, coated in a paper-thin cornmeal breading, are complemented by the house-made spicy tartar sauce and Louisiana-style hot sauce. It’s also not a bad call to swap the “chips” for a handful of the restaurant’s crispy hush puppies.

A paper boat full of pieces of fried catfish.
The fried catfish at Jackson’s Catfish Corner.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Proper Fish

One big fried piece of fish with some fries.
The fish and chips at Proper Fish.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

The fish and chips at Bainbridge Island’s Proper Fish looks exactly like what’s served at an English seaside pub: a twelve-inch length of cod, served with thick-cut chips and a dollop of mushy peas. The only thing missing is the waterfront view. Luckily, the crispy batter will survive the five-minute walk down to the Waterfront Park, where diners can indulge in one of Seattle’s most traditional takes on the dish.

One big fried piece of fish with some fries.
The fish and chips at Proper Fish.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Marination Ma Kai

Two pieces of panko-crusted fish with fries.
The panko-crusted fish and chips at Marination Ma Kai.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

For fish and chips at Alki Beach, try skipping the classic spots on the main strip to stop by Hawaiian restaurant Marination Ma Kai. The breading has layers upon layers of crispy panko, and signature sauces like the miso ginger tartar aren’t found anywhere else in the city. Patrons can avoid the line, which is guaranteed to be out the door on a sunny day, by ordering ahead online.

Two pieces of panko-crusted fish with fries.
The panko-crusted fish and chips at Marination Ma Kai.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Burien Fish House

Three pieces of beer-battered halibut with fries in a paper takeout container.
The beer-battered halibut at Burien Fish House.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

At Burien Fish House, diners choose their own fish and chips adventures. The menu allows choices for the type of fish (halibut, salmon, cod, or shrimp), the number of pieces, the type of breading or batter, and it offers selections of ten sauces (including three housemade tartars). For those who are decision-averse, the beer-battered halibut and a side of jalapeno tartar is an excellent choice.

Three pieces of beer-battered halibut with fries in a paper takeout container.
The beer-battered halibut at Burien Fish House.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Bait Shop

Two pieces of beer-battered fish and fries.
The beer-battered fish and chips at Bait Shop.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Capitol Hill’s Bait Shop boasts that its fries are world-famous, and they might actually be deserving of that title. Each fry has a seemingly-impossible contrast of crunchy outside to pillowy potato inside. The two sizable pieces of fish are heavily beer-battered — excellent alongside a pint at the bar — but don’t survive a trip home quite as well.

Two pieces of beer-battered fish and fries.
The beer-battered fish and chips at Bait Shop.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Old Stove Brewing

Three pieces of beer-battered fish and fries laid out on a newspaper.
The English-style fish and chips at Old Stove Brewing.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

In lieu of the “been here for a hundred years” vibe throughout the rest of Pike Place Market, Old Stove offers views of the Puget Sound and a creative beer list. The fish and chips, battered using the brewery’s Belgian Blonde ale, is a wonderful rendition of the English style.

Three pieces of beer-battered fish and fries laid out on a newspaper.
The English-style fish and chips at Old Stove Brewing.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Pacific Inn Pub

Two pieces of panko-crusted fish with fries, coleslaw, and tartar sauce.
The panko-breaded fish and chips at Pacific Inn Pub.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Pacific Inn’s secretly-spiced, panko-breaded fish and chips got Uncle Tony’s blessing in a 2017 Seattle episode of “Parts Unknown”. Most orders soak up late-night pitchers in the cozy barroom, but they also make an affordable lunch enjoyed on the patio.

Two pieces of panko-crusted fish with fries, coleslaw, and tartar sauce.
The panko-breaded fish and chips at Pacific Inn Pub.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Macleod’s Scottish Pub

One large piece of heavily battered fish with fries and tartar sauce.
The fish and chips at Macleo’ds Scottish Pub.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

Edinburgh native Alan MacLeod opened Macleod’s in 2011, delivering single-malt Scotch and Scottish fare to the heart of Ballard. The fish and chips now headlines the concise menu, which includes a happy hour portion available from 4-6pm. The bright green mushy peas are a highlight.

One large piece of heavily battered fish with fries and tartar sauce.
The fish and chips at Macleo’ds Scottish Pub.
Nate Hall/Eater Seattle

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