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A closeup view of chicken wings.
The fried chicken wings from Quick Pack Food Mart in Seattle’s Central District.
Jenise Silva

16 Spots for Knockout Fried Chicken in the Seattle Area

The city offers the dish in a dizzying array of styles

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The fried chicken wings from Quick Pack Food Mart in Seattle’s Central District.
| Jenise Silva

From buckets of teriyaki karaage in Capitol Hill, crackling-crisp Filipino-style drumsticks in Phinney Ridge, to Southern-style thighs in the Central District, Seattle offers fantastic fried chicken in a dizzying array of styles. As seen throughout the pandemic, the dish makes a quick and easy to-go meal — although, to maintain crispiness, it’s best not to let it sit too long. Here are some favorites from all over the Seattle area. (For those craving even more wing selections, there’s a map for that, too.)

Know of a spot that should be on our radar? Send us a tip by emailing seattle@eater.com. As usual, this list is not ranked; it’s organized geographically.

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Chicken Prince

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This Edmonds pub (a karaoke favorite in pre-pandemic times) has built a reputation for slinging some seriously excellent Korean fried chicken, which diners can order “naked” or seasoned with garlic, sweet and spicy, extra spicy, or honey butter.

Kona Kitchen

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This casual Hawaiian restaurant with locations in Maple Leaf and Lynnwood serves an perfectly-executed mochiko chicken, served with rice and mac salad. The light rice-flour batter on this popular Hawaiian dish leaves the pieces of chicken super tender while imparting just a touch of crispiness. Beyond the mochiko chicken, Kona Kitchen also serves good renditions of Korean fried chicken, katsu chicken, and chicken strips.

The Chicken Supply

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When Phinney Ridge’s fine-dining restaurant Opus Co. shuttered last year, the restaurant’s chef, Paolo Campbell, took the opportunity to start his own Filipino fried chicken restaurant, which opened in October. The gluten-free batter on the chicken — wings, drumsticks, or 10-inch long cylinders of white meat on sticks — crackles under the teeth and has the puffy texture of Rice Krispies or Frosted Flakes. The meat is packed with flavor from soy sauce and garlic. Order the chicken with some toasty garlic rice and a side of tangy marinated eggplant and onions to cut the grease. The restaurant runs out of most of its dishes every day, so it’s a good idea to plan ahead and preorder online in the morning for a chicken dinner.

Cookie's Country Chicken

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It’s only fitting that Cookie’s Country Chicken has found a home in Ballard, a neighborhood with strong nautical ties. Owner Brian Chandler spent 10 years in the maritime industry, including a stint spent perfecting his fried chicken recipe while feeding oil industry crews in Louisiana. Chandler started Cookie’s as a pop-up, having a consistent spot in Pioneer Square. The new Ballard location includes more menu offerings, with spicy and regular chicken and sides like mashed potatoes with gravy, mac and cheese, and collard greens.

Chi Mac

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There’s stiff competition when it comes to Korean fried chicken in Seattle, but this U District counter service restaurant doesn’t disappoint. The restaurant batters and sauces its chicken with a light touch, whether diners choose dry, parmesan-sprinkled snow wings or delicately glazed, crispy soy garlic wings.

Yoroshiku

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This Wallingford izakaya serves dishes from Hokkaido, Japan’s northernmost island, like scallops grilled with butter, as well as drinking snacks like pork bao and fries made of spam. The restaurant only serves one type of fried chicken — zangi, a super-crispy, shoyu-and-sake-marinated Hokkaido invention, which at Yoroshiku, is served with garlic miso sauce. But the flavor in each piece of boneless thigh meat is so deep, and the batter so delicate, that you don’t need other options.

A few pieces of boneless thigh fried chicken with some aioli on a rectangular black plate.
Yoroshiku’s Zangi chicken is marinated in soy sauce and sake.
Yoroshiku

19 GOLD Taiwanese Restaurant

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This pint-sized Taiwanese restaurant in Fremont serves some of the best popcorn chicken in the city — just the right amount of sweet, salty, and savory — topped with crispy fried basil leaves. You can order the chicken on its own, atop fries and drizzled with sauce, or with fatty braised pork rice, salted cabbage, and a marinated egg as an entree.

Light-brown nuggets of fried chicken on a mottled grey rectangular plate, garnished with fried Thai basil leaves.
The popcorn chicken at 19 Gold, a Taiwanese restaurant in Fremont.
Courtesy of 19 Gold

Sisters and Brothers

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One of the few places in the city to get true blue Nashville hot chicken, this hugely popular restaurant once drew crowds in Georgetown, and has since debuted a restaurant in the Lower Queen Anne-Interbay neighborhood. Whether the heat level is “mild” or “insane,” diners get hit with serious spice. Don’t forget about the sides, like collard greens, fried green tomatoes, and cabbage and pepper slaw.

Ma’ono Fried Chicken

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Mark Fuller recently closed the brick-and-mortar West Seattle location for Ma’ono, which serves what many consider the best fried chicken in Seattle. But he’s still operating the business as a pop-up inside of the Rachel’s Ginger Beer locations in U Village and South Lake Union, as well as at his newly reopened bar, Admiral Denbow Room, in West Seattle on Mondays and Tuesdays. The menu features drumsticks, chicken fingers, and fried chicken sandwiches with Kewpie mayo on a Hawaiian bun. Fuller also serves a number of Hawaiian-inspired sides including kimchi mac n cheese, a cucumber and wakame “poke” salad (which contains no fish), and potato mac salad.

Jerk Shack

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For something a little different than the typical fried chickens dredged in flour, one might want to check out the mind-blowing birds at this Belltown restaurant from chef Trey Lamont. The famed half-fried chicken here is covered in jerk spices and pairs well with the tropical rum cocktails on the menu.

At his lively Capitol Hill restaurant and Osaka-style bar, star chef Shota Nakajima focuses on marinated, battered, and twice-fried karaage with dry and wet seasonings including curry, teriyaki, and salt and pepper. A “Fuckit Bucket” easily feeds three or four people with three full pounds of chicken over a pound of fries and some shredded cabbage, and a late-night dine-in-only menu with Japanese egg sandwiches and fried rice is available until 1:30 a.m.

A paper takeout bucket filled with karaage, with a label displaying the name of the restaurant Taku
Taku offers selections of karaage.
Stephanie Forrer

Ooink Capitol Hill

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One of Seattle’s best ramen shops is owned by a Malaysian chef, Chong Boon Ooi, and he serves an excellent rendition of ayam goreng (Malaysian fried chicken) at his Capitol Hill restaurant (and new Fremont offshoot.) The chicken here has no marinade, and hardly any flour, but is powerfully fragrant with a mix of spices like turmeric, galangal, lemongrass, chilies, garlic, and curry leaf. An order of this chicken makes a good shared appetizer for a ramen meal. You can also order Ooink’s $10 spicy fried chicken sandwich if you want fried chicken to be the whole meal.

Fat's Chicken and Waffles

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The main events at this Central District favorite are the honey butter chicken biscuit sandwich and the restaurant’s namesake sampler, with two pieces of chicken served alongside fried green tomatoes, cheese grits, and garlic toast. Fat’s is open for takeout, and dine-in service includes its enormously popular brunch.

A top-down view of a plate of fried chicken and waffles.
Chicken and waffles at Fat’s.
Fat’s Chicken and Waffles

Quick Pack Food Mart

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Given the breakneck pace of development around the Central District-Leschi area, here’s hoping Quick Pack is a holdout for years to come. When fresh out of the fryer, the oversized wings and juicy thighs at this unassuming convenience store rival the best birds in the city. Available for takeout only.

A closeup view of chicken wings.
The fried chicken wings from Quick Pack Food Mart.
Jenise Silva

Gan Bei 21 and up

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This Chinatown-International District bar serves some of the best Chinese comfort food around, and its signature dish is fried chicken thighs and drumsticks. At Ganbei, the meat is seasoned mildly, and the batter is light and crackly, locking the juice inside. All orders come with warm five-spice gravy and rice. The XO-sauce green beans make a nice, umami-packed side to a chicken dinner.

Island Soul

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This longtime Columbia City destination serves up Caribbean and Louisiana soul food dishes. Among some of the must-try dishes is the fried Cornish game hen, which has a satisfying crunch and is a nice departure from some of the greasier fried poultry in the city.

Chicken Prince

This Edmonds pub (a karaoke favorite in pre-pandemic times) has built a reputation for slinging some seriously excellent Korean fried chicken, which diners can order “naked” or seasoned with garlic, sweet and spicy, extra spicy, or honey butter.

Kona Kitchen

This casual Hawaiian restaurant with locations in Maple Leaf and Lynnwood serves an perfectly-executed mochiko chicken, served with rice and mac salad. The light rice-flour batter on this popular Hawaiian dish leaves the pieces of chicken super tender while imparting just a touch of crispiness. Beyond the mochiko chicken, Kona Kitchen also serves good renditions of Korean fried chicken, katsu chicken, and chicken strips.

The Chicken Supply

When Phinney Ridge’s fine-dining restaurant Opus Co. shuttered last year, the restaurant’s chef, Paolo Campbell, took the opportunity to start his own Filipino fried chicken restaurant, which opened in October. The gluten-free batter on the chicken — wings, drumsticks, or 10-inch long cylinders of white meat on sticks — crackles under the teeth and has the puffy texture of Rice Krispies or Frosted Flakes. The meat is packed with flavor from soy sauce and garlic. Order the chicken with some toasty garlic rice and a side of tangy marinated eggplant and onions to cut the grease. The restaurant runs out of most of its dishes every day, so it’s a good idea to plan ahead and preorder online in the morning for a chicken dinner.

Cookie's Country Chicken

It’s only fitting that Cookie’s Country Chicken has found a home in Ballard, a neighborhood with strong nautical ties. Owner Brian Chandler spent 10 years in the maritime industry, including a stint spent perfecting his fried chicken recipe while feeding oil industry crews in Louisiana. Chandler started Cookie’s as a pop-up, having a consistent spot in Pioneer Square. The new Ballard location includes more menu offerings, with spicy and regular chicken and sides like mashed potatoes with gravy, mac and cheese, and collard greens.

Chi Mac

There’s stiff competition when it comes to Korean fried chicken in Seattle, but this U District counter service restaurant doesn’t disappoint. The restaurant batters and sauces its chicken with a light touch, whether diners choose dry, parmesan-sprinkled snow wings or delicately glazed, crispy soy garlic wings.

Yoroshiku

This Wallingford izakaya serves dishes from Hokkaido, Japan’s northernmost island, like scallops grilled with butter, as well as drinking snacks like pork bao and fries made of spam. The restaurant only serves one type of fried chicken — zangi, a super-crispy, shoyu-and-sake-marinated Hokkaido invention, which at Yoroshiku, is served with garlic miso sauce. But the flavor in each piece of boneless thigh meat is so deep, and the batter so delicate, that you don’t need other options.

A few pieces of boneless thigh fried chicken with some aioli on a rectangular black plate.
Yoroshiku’s Zangi chicken is marinated in soy sauce and sake.
Yoroshiku

19 GOLD Taiwanese Restaurant

This pint-sized Taiwanese restaurant in Fremont serves some of the best popcorn chicken in the city — just the right amount of sweet, salty, and savory — topped with crispy fried basil leaves. You can order the chicken on its own, atop fries and drizzled with sauce, or with fatty braised pork rice, salted cabbage, and a marinated egg as an entree.

Light-brown nuggets of fried chicken on a mottled grey rectangular plate, garnished with fried Thai basil leaves.
The popcorn chicken at 19 Gold, a Taiwanese restaurant in Fremont.
Courtesy of 19 Gold

Sisters and Brothers

One of the few places in the city to get true blue Nashville hot chicken, this hugely popular restaurant once drew crowds in Georgetown, and has since debuted a restaurant in the Lower Queen Anne-Interbay neighborhood. Whether the heat level is “mild” or “insane,” diners get hit with serious spice. Don’t forget about the sides, like collard greens, fried green tomatoes, and cabbage and pepper slaw.

Ma’ono Fried Chicken

Mark Fuller recently closed the brick-and-mortar West Seattle location for Ma’ono, which serves what many consider the best fried chicken in Seattle. But he’s still operating the business as a pop-up inside of the Rachel’s Ginger Beer locations in U Village and South Lake Union, as well as at his newly reopened bar, Admiral Denbow Room, in West Seattle on Mondays and Tuesdays. The menu features drumsticks, chicken fingers, and fried chicken sandwiches with Kewpie mayo on a Hawaiian bun. Fuller also serves a number of Hawaiian-inspired sides including kimchi mac n cheese, a cucumber and wakame “poke” salad (which contains no fish), and potato mac salad.

Jerk Shack

For something a little different than the typical fried chickens dredged in flour, one might want to check out the mind-blowing birds at this Belltown restaurant from chef Trey Lamont. The famed half-fried chicken here is covered in jerk spices and pairs well with the tropical rum cocktails on the menu.

Taku

At his lively Capitol Hill restaurant and Osaka-style bar, star chef Shota Nakajima focuses on marinated, battered, and twice-fried karaage with dry and wet seasonings including curry, teriyaki, and salt and pepper. A “Fuckit Bucket” easily feeds three or four people with three full pounds of chicken over a pound of fries and some shredded cabbage, and a late-night dine-in-only menu with Japanese egg sandwiches and fried rice is available until 1:30 a.m.

A paper takeout bucket filled with karaage, with a label displaying the name of the restaurant Taku
Taku offers selections of karaage.
Stephanie Forrer

Ooink Capitol Hill

One of Seattle’s best ramen shops is owned by a Malaysian chef, Chong Boon Ooi, and he serves an excellent rendition of ayam goreng (Malaysian fried chicken) at his Capitol Hill restaurant (and new Fremont offshoot.) The chicken here has no marinade, and hardly any flour, but is powerfully fragrant with a mix of spices like turmeric, galangal, lemongrass, chilies, garlic, and curry leaf. An order of this chicken makes a good shared appetizer for a ramen meal. You can also order Ooink’s $10 spicy fried chicken sandwich if you want fried chicken to be the whole meal.

Fat's Chicken and Waffles

The main events at this Central District favorite are the honey butter chicken biscuit sandwich and the restaurant’s namesake sampler, with two pieces of chicken served alongside fried green tomatoes, cheese grits, and garlic toast. Fat’s is open for takeout, and dine-in service includes its enormously popular brunch.

A top-down view of a plate of fried chicken and waffles.
Chicken and waffles at Fat’s.
Fat’s Chicken and Waffles

Quick Pack Food Mart

Given the breakneck pace of development around the Central District-Leschi area, here’s hoping Quick Pack is a holdout for years to come. When fresh out of the fryer, the oversized wings and juicy thighs at this unassuming convenience store rival the best birds in the city. Available for takeout only.

A closeup view of chicken wings.
The fried chicken wings from Quick Pack Food Mart.
Jenise Silva

Gan Bei 21 and up

This Chinatown-International District bar serves some of the best Chinese comfort food around, and its signature dish is fried chicken thighs and drumsticks. At Ganbei, the meat is seasoned mildly, and the batter is light and crackly, locking the juice inside. All orders come with warm five-spice gravy and rice. The XO-sauce green beans make a nice, umami-packed side to a chicken dinner.

Related Maps

Island Soul

This longtime Columbia City destination serves up Caribbean and Louisiana soul food dishes. Among some of the must-try dishes is the fried Cornish game hen, which has a satisfying crunch and is a nice departure from some of the greasier fried poultry in the city.

Related Maps