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Four rectangular pop tarts on a marble countertop.
Askatu’s gluten-free pop tarts. Two pop tarts in the center are topped with white icing and golden sprinkles, and the two on either end are topped with white icing and purple sprinkles.
Drea Parlin

Where to Eat Fantastic Gluten-Free Food in Seattle

Seattle offers excellent gluten-free options, with pizzas, tapas, empanadas, and more

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Askatu’s gluten-free pop tarts. Two pop tarts in the center are topped with white icing and golden sprinkles, and the two on either end are topped with white icing and purple sprinkles.
| Drea Parlin

With restaurants embracing gluten-free cooking, it’s easier than ever for those with a gluten intolerance or celiac disease to dine out in style. Seattle’s gluten-free world is expanding by the day, and old staples are increasingly keeping their menus fresh.

Good gluten-free dining can mean pizza, pasta, bread, sweets — everything that seems like it’d be verboten for those avoiding wheat, barley, and rye. While most of the great eats on this list come from true gluten-free kitchens, some places that serve up great gluten fare do not have dedicated tools. As such, this map denotes which kitchens should be entirely safe, and which are great at accommodating. Some new additions include Frankie & Jo’s ice cream, El Parche Colombiano, the Chicken Supply, and Askatu Bakery. Know of a spot that should be on our radar? Send us a tip by emailing seattle@eater.com. As usual, this list is not ranked; it’s organized geographically.

Note: Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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El Parche Colombiano

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With everything on the menu gluten-free except postre de maracuya and Pony Malta, a non-alcoholic beverage from Colombia, El Parche is a great place for anyone to eat, regardless of gluten sensitivity. To sample a variety of different foods, the bandeja paisa is reminiscent of a full English breakfast with its fried egg, tenderly cooked pinto beans, shredded beef carne molida, chorizo, arepas, and tajadas maduras (fried sweet plantains). Super-crispy golden-brown empanadas, made with corn dough, are filled with potatoes and cheese, or your choice of meat. And on a hot summer day, you can cool down with a tropical juice prepared with ingredients like sweet guayaba (guava), maracuya (passion fruit), or if you’re craving a bitingly sour orange-lemon citrus drink, lulo (also known as naranjilla), a fruit that looks similar to a tomato crossed with a persimmon. For dessert, El Parche’s coffee flan tastes like a dense, rich tiramisu.

Razzi's Pizzeria

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This pizzeria with locations in Greenwood and Downtown is the holy grail of allergen-safe dining. Four separate, distinct menus mean that vegan and celiac friends can finally dine at the same time. Razzi's kitchen is certified gluten-free (yes, that’s a real thing) and the menu holds a plethora of other gluten-free items, including beers on tap.

Asiana Bistro

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Seattle is known for teriyaki, but it can be nearly-impossible to find gluten-free options. In Redmond, Asiana Bistro’s teriyaki is charbroiled, served with steamed rice and salad to enjoy every last bite. All the Chinese, Korean, and Japanese dishes are cooked with gluten-free soy sauce because the original owner was celiac. The only items on the menu made with wheat are the udon and yakisoba noodles, katsu, gyoza, and wontons.

Teriyaki chicken served with two round scoops of rice and cabbage in styrofoam takeout containers with sriracha bottle in the background.
Teriyaki chicken at Asiana Bistro.
Sabra Boyd

Flying Apron Bakery (multiple locations)

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Fying Apron's two locations in Fremont and Redmond are dedicated to gluten-free goods, with counters full of sweets like cinnamon rolls, as well as savory items including the real star of the business: pizza. Big slices come smothered in inventive and healthy toppings, with a substantial crust to hold them all together.

Heartbeet Organic Superfoods Cafe

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This casual vegan spot uses fresh ingredients for dishes made from scratch and also boasts a completely dairy and gluten-free menu. Known for its smoothies and warm grain bowls, this cafe is great for a quick lunch on-the-go and is safe for people with celiac disease. The Buddha Bowl with marinated mushrooms and onion cashew cream is a crowd favorite. For dessert, Heartbeet’s pure pies, which are similar to a vegan cheesecake, include flavors like a rich chocolate mousse torte, bright key lime, and tiramisu with a geometric dusting of cocoa powder.

Wildflour Gluten-Free Baking Company

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The day has come for gluten-free baguettes: This Eastside bake shop easily stands up to some of downtown Seattle’s best gluten-free facilities, touting everything from cranberry hazelnut rolls to Irish coffee scones. But the French bread is the must-try item here.

Duke's Seafood & Chowder (multiple locations)

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This popular Seattle seafood chain has recently stepped up its gluten-free game. Though not a dedicated gluten-free restaurant, Duke’s has a full gluten-free menu, which now includes all of its signature chowders. The Greenlake, Alki and Lake Union locations are the best bets for a quintessentially Seattle ambience.

Cafe Flora

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This Madison Valley favorite’s restaurant space is covered in large plants in pots, living up to the restaurant’s name. The menu is vegetarian, mostly gluten-free, and employs ingredients from the Pacific Northwest, with dishes like nettle pesto risotto and grain bowls with roasted veggies, edamame, and crispy tofu. The restaurant has a gluten-free menu and a dedicated gluten-free fryer.

Nuflours

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This small shop with big front windows and a completely gluten-free kitchen is mostly focused on sweets and bakery favorites, from lemon bars to hazelnut brownies to gingersnaps. But the shop also makes more traditional breakfast and lunch offerings, too, like quiche, scones, and toast. It also provides detailed ingredient lists so every diner knows what items contain potential allergens.

Askatu Bakery

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Nestled in Belltown, Askatu Bakery serves nut-free and gluten-free lunch and pastries, as well as cakes and breads without added guar and xanthan gums. The jackfruit-veggie bao is a warm and savory handheld treat, perfect when you’re on the go. And with the display case items changing every season, you’ll find ube mooncakes during Lunar New Year, sugar cookies that look like dahlias in the summer, hamantaschen in observance of Purim, and gooey cinnamon rolls to enjoy in winter. Whatever the occasion, Askatu’s nut-free ceci butter cookies are a popular favorite, similar to crisp melt-in-your-mouth Dutch stroopwafels.

Three red velvet doughnuts sit on a rectangular white platter on a wooden table. The doughnuts have a white icing on top with dark red sprinkles on top.
Askatu’s red velvet doughnuts.
Drea Parlin

Capitol Cider

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The wheat-free sweetheart of the Pike and Pine corridor, Capitol Cider gives the gluten-intolerant a great Friday-night alternative to all the breweries. The restaurant serves gluten-free hard cider and dishes in a 100 percent gluten- and peanut-free kitchen, from brunch to late night depending on the day. And there’s also shuffleboard.

Umi Sake House

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Contrary to popular belief, it’s not always that easy to find a good gluten-free sushi spot, but Umi Sake House in Belltown does the trick. This late-night Belltown destination for sushi, sake, and Japanese whisky offers an impressive list of nigiri and sushi rolls — which include traditional Japanese versions as well as creative American-style specialty rolls like the Dragonfly, made with tempura shrimp, yellowtail, grilled shishito peppers and ghost pepper aioli. Omakase, (starting at $50 per person) is also an option. The restaurant also offers more than 60 imported sake options.

Frankie & Jo's (multiple locations)

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The sweet scent of Frankie & Jo’s maple waffle cones draw a happy crowd to this gluten-free plant-based ice cream shop year round. With bases made from cashews, oat milk, and fermented coconut yogurt, seasonal flavors showcase an impressive range of local ingredients and edible flowers. From rhubarb or citrusy Doug Fir in the spring, to kabocha squash pumpkin in the fall, new varieties are bound to pop up each month alongside classic flavors like chocolate tahini and brown sugar vanilla.

Ghostfish Brewing Company

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This gluten-free brewery’s award-winning IPAs, stouts, and even sours, made with grains like millet and buckwheat instead of barley, pair beautifully with its gluten-free food, like customizable flatbreads, fish and chips, burgers, and cheesecake. As an extra bonus, the menu denotes which items are vegan, and the establishment is dog-friendly.

Cafe Ibex

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Cafe Ibex’s menu is not entirely gluten-free, the gluten-free injera (available upon request) is airy and has a light, nutty flavor that pairs well with everything. Ordering a variety of dishes is recommended, and there are many vegetarian options such as misir wot with red lentils, or the savory gomen’s spinach. Cafe Ibex’s tibs, a spicy meat stew made with berbere spice, is satisfy and pairs nicely with the gluten-free injera.

Itto's Tapas

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With almost 95% of the menu sans gluten, this West Seattle tapas restaurant influenced by Spanish and Moroccan cuisine is an oasis for gluten-free tapas lovers. Start the meal with an intricate cocktail, like the Taza Throb with cardamom bitters, and move on to the plancha grilled beef tenderloin, a house favorite.

The Chicken Supply

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Greenwood Filipino fried chicken shop the Chicken Supply is quickly becoming a fried bird superstar in Seattle for its crackly, skin-shattering gluten-free chicken offerings, which are sold by the piece (stick, wing, drumstick, or thigh). The chicken is marinated in gluten-free soy, lending to its juicy interior and umami flavor profile; the sides, like its tangy pancit and coconuty collard greens, are also gluten-free, so diners won’t have to pick and choose on what can be eaten on the menu. Pre-order online the day you want to go — the chicken has a tendency to sell out before close.

Two paper boats with a fried chicken thigh, drumstick, wing, and breast meat on a stick, with a rice noodle salad with tomatoes, celery, and cabbage in a separate boat, and takeout containers of garlic rice and collard greens in coconuty milk. Suzi Pratt/Eater Seattle

El Parche Colombiano

With everything on the menu gluten-free except postre de maracuya and Pony Malta, a non-alcoholic beverage from Colombia, El Parche is a great place for anyone to eat, regardless of gluten sensitivity. To sample a variety of different foods, the bandeja paisa is reminiscent of a full English breakfast with its fried egg, tenderly cooked pinto beans, shredded beef carne molida, chorizo, arepas, and tajadas maduras (fried sweet plantains). Super-crispy golden-brown empanadas, made with corn dough, are filled with potatoes and cheese, or your choice of meat. And on a hot summer day, you can cool down with a tropical juice prepared with ingredients like sweet guayaba (guava), maracuya (passion fruit), or if you’re craving a bitingly sour orange-lemon citrus drink, lulo (also known as naranjilla), a fruit that looks similar to a tomato crossed with a persimmon. For dessert, El Parche’s coffee flan tastes like a dense, rich tiramisu.

Razzi's Pizzeria

This pizzeria with locations in Greenwood and Downtown is the holy grail of allergen-safe dining. Four separate, distinct menus mean that vegan and celiac friends can finally dine at the same time. Razzi's kitchen is certified gluten-free (yes, that’s a real thing) and the menu holds a plethora of other gluten-free items, including beers on tap.

Asiana Bistro

Teriyaki chicken served with two round scoops of rice and cabbage in styrofoam takeout containers with sriracha bottle in the background.
Teriyaki chicken at Asiana Bistro.
Sabra Boyd

Seattle is known for teriyaki, but it can be nearly-impossible to find gluten-free options. In Redmond, Asiana Bistro’s teriyaki is charbroiled, served with steamed rice and salad to enjoy every last bite. All the Chinese, Korean, and Japanese dishes are cooked with gluten-free soy sauce because the original owner was celiac. The only items on the menu made with wheat are the udon and yakisoba noodles, katsu, gyoza, and wontons.

Teriyaki chicken served with two round scoops of rice and cabbage in styrofoam takeout containers with sriracha bottle in the background.
Teriyaki chicken at Asiana Bistro.
Sabra Boyd

Flying Apron Bakery (multiple locations)

Fying Apron's two locations in Fremont and Redmond are dedicated to gluten-free goods, with counters full of sweets like cinnamon rolls, as well as savory items including the real star of the business: pizza. Big slices come smothered in inventive and healthy toppings, with a substantial crust to hold them all together.

Heartbeet Organic Superfoods Cafe

This casual vegan spot uses fresh ingredients for dishes made from scratch and also boasts a completely dairy and gluten-free menu. Known for its smoothies and warm grain bowls, this cafe is great for a quick lunch on-the-go and is safe for people with celiac disease. The Buddha Bowl with marinated mushrooms and onion cashew cream is a crowd favorite. For dessert, Heartbeet’s pure pies, which are similar to a vegan cheesecake, include flavors like a rich chocolate mousse torte, bright key lime, and tiramisu with a geometric dusting of cocoa powder.

Wildflour Gluten-Free Baking Company

The day has come for gluten-free baguettes: This Eastside bake shop easily stands up to some of downtown Seattle’s best gluten-free facilities, touting everything from cranberry hazelnut rolls to Irish coffee scones. But the French bread is the must-try item here.

Duke's Seafood & Chowder (multiple locations)

This popular Seattle seafood chain has recently stepped up its gluten-free game. Though not a dedicated gluten-free restaurant, Duke’s has a full gluten-free menu, which now includes all of its signature chowders. The Greenlake, Alki and Lake Union locations are the best bets for a quintessentially Seattle ambience.

Cafe Flora

This Madison Valley favorite’s restaurant space is covered in large plants in pots, living up to the restaurant’s name. The menu is vegetarian, mostly gluten-free, and employs ingredients from the Pacific Northwest, with dishes like nettle pesto risotto and grain bowls with roasted veggies, edamame, and crispy tofu. The restaurant has a gluten-free menu and a dedicated gluten-free fryer.

Nuflours

This small shop with big front windows and a completely gluten-free kitchen is mostly focused on sweets and bakery favorites, from lemon bars to hazelnut brownies to gingersnaps. But the shop also makes more traditional breakfast and lunch offerings, too, like quiche, scones, and toast. It also provides detailed ingredient lists so every diner knows what items contain potential allergens.

Askatu Bakery

Three red velvet doughnuts sit on a rectangular white platter on a wooden table. The doughnuts have a white icing on top with dark red sprinkles on top.
Askatu’s red velvet doughnuts.
Drea Parlin

Nestled in Belltown, Askatu Bakery serves nut-free and gluten-free lunch and pastries, as well as cakes and breads without added guar and xanthan gums. The jackfruit-veggie bao is a warm and savory handheld treat, perfect when you’re on the go. And with the display case items changing every season, you’ll find ube mooncakes during Lunar New Year, sugar cookies that look like dahlias in the summer, hamantaschen in observance of Purim, and gooey cinnamon rolls to enjoy in winter. Whatever the occasion, Askatu’s nut-free ceci butter cookies are a popular favorite, similar to crisp melt-in-your-mouth Dutch stroopwafels.

Three red velvet doughnuts sit on a rectangular white platter on a wooden table. The doughnuts have a white icing on top with dark red sprinkles on top.
Askatu’s red velvet doughnuts.
Drea Parlin

Capitol Cider

The wheat-free sweetheart of the Pike and Pine corridor, Capitol Cider gives the gluten-intolerant a great Friday-night alternative to all the breweries. The restaurant serves gluten-free hard cider and dishes in a 100 percent gluten- and peanut-free kitchen, from brunch to late night depending on the day. And there’s also shuffleboard.

Umi Sake House

Contrary to popular belief, it’s not always that easy to find a good gluten-free sushi spot, but Umi Sake House in Belltown does the trick. This late-night Belltown destination for sushi, sake, and Japanese whisky offers an impressive list of nigiri and sushi rolls — which include traditional Japanese versions as well as creative American-style specialty rolls like the Dragonfly, made with tempura shrimp, yellowtail, grilled shishito peppers and ghost pepper aioli. Omakase, (starting at $50 per person) is also an option. The restaurant also offers more than 60 imported sake options.

Frankie & Jo's (multiple locations)

The sweet scent of Frankie & Jo’s maple waffle cones draw a happy crowd to this gluten-free plant-based ice cream shop year round. With bases made from cashews, oat milk, and fermented coconut yogurt, seasonal flavors showcase an impressive range of local ingredients and edible flowers. From rhubarb or citrusy Doug Fir in the spring, to kabocha squash pumpkin in the fall, new varieties are bound to pop up each month alongside classic flavors like chocolate tahini and brown sugar vanilla.

Ghostfish Brewing Company