clock menu more-arrow no yes
A stone hot pot near a side of raw meat at Chengdu Memory.
Hot pot at Chengdu Memory in the International District.
Jay Friedman for Eater

10 Top Hot Pot Restaurants in the Seattle Area

These places are perfect for escaping winter’s chill

View as Map
Hot pot at Chengdu Memory in the International District.
| Jay Friedman for Eater

While hot pot is not new to Seattle’s food scene, it has taken a front row seat in recent years, with major global chains opening up around town, especially in the International District, Bellevue, and Redmond. And there will be more to come, most notably the highly anticipated Ha Di Lao. From flashy and luxurious, to longtime fixtures, these restaurants will provide a look into some of the best, soul-warming hot pots that the city has to offer right now, especially for those still new to the dish and who want to try different styles.

These places are not ranked, but listed geographically, from west to east. If you think we missed a spot or want us to consider adding something for a later update, send us a tip.

For all the latest Seattle dining intel, subscribe to Eater Seattle’s newsletter.

Read More
Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Boiling Point

Copy Link
610 5th Ave S
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 737-8506
Visit Website

This Taiwanese shop in the International District specializes in serving a more passive version of hot pot where, instead of providing diners with raw ingredients, the pot is filled to the brim with precooked items and reheated at the table. The house special is the real draw, and features ingredients such as pork intestines, pork blood cake, and fermented tofu.

Hot Pot King’s steaming “House Special” with stinky tofu.
“House Special” with tofu at Hot Pot King.
Jay Friedman for Eater

2. Chengdu Memory

Copy Link
520 S Jackson St
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 624-6289
Visit Website

Fans of spicy broths should go for the strong, mala soup base at this relative newcomer to the International District. The Chengdu Three Treasures dish comes with beef aorta, tripe, and omasum, meats that are not readily available at most hot pot shops in Seattle. Pro tip: the sweet potato noodles soak up the broth best.

A stone hot pot near a side of raw meat at Chengdu Memory.
Chengdu Memory has yin-yang bowls separating different types of broth.
Jay Friedman for Eater

3. Little Sheep Mongolian Hot Pot

Copy Link
609 S Weller St
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 623-6700

This international chain — with outposts in the International District and Bellevue — takes a slightly different tack than similar places by not really encouraging DIY meat and vegetable sauce dipping. But the restaurant adds so many different herbs to its soup bases, creating a fragrant, rich, and aromatic broth, that it really doesn’t matter. Servings of lamb, a Mongolian hot pot staple, rounds out the experience.

The regular and spicy broths in a silver bowl at Little Sheep.
The regular and spicy broths at Little Sheep.
Jay Friedman for Eater

4. Gourmet Noodle Bowl

Copy Link
707 8th Ave S
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 264-8899
Visit Website

This International District mainstay offers both all-you-can-eat and individual hot pot options. The soup bases are mild and light, the portions are large, and the prices are affordable. It’s also worth noting that the tables are supplied with plenty of garlic, peanut sauce, and most importantly, “Sha Cha Jiang” (Taiwanese barbecue sauce), a cornerstone to any Taiwanese hot pot experience.

5. Hot Pot King

Copy Link
710 8th Ave S #3006
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 502-6663
Visit Website

This International District spot serves up Chongqing-style hot pot (a beef tallow-based soup, turned red from the addition of chilis and Sichuan peppers) with a choice of two different soup bases, original or spicy. Spice levels range from 1-10, but be warned — upping it may result in a broth that’s a bit too extreme for the uninitiated. Chunks of beef fat in animal shaped molds provide diners with a playful way to increase their broths’ richness and flavor content.

6. Morfire

Copy Link
1806 12th Ave Suite 100
Seattle, WA 98122
(206) 829-8293
Visit Website

Morfire in Capitol Hill fills in a major gap in Seattle’s Thai food scene through its hot pot, or suki, offerings. The broths are accompanied by sauces that give off sweet and sour flavors, with unmistakable heat shining through. Don’t forget to try the Suki Hang, or dry hot pot, which features stir-fried glass noodles mixed with a spicy sauce from Thai chili peppers, all served up on a sizzling cast iron pan. There’s a delicate sweetness from a hint of preserved bean curd.

7. The Dolar Shop

Copy Link
11020 NE 6th St #90
Bellevue, WA 98004
(425) 390-8888
Visit Website

Bellevue’s high-end hot pot restaurant (part of a global chain) serves thick-cut wagyu beef and A5 Japanese Miyazaki beef, while the seafood options include live crab and geoduck. With a sauce bar containing 21 different options, rich broths, and high-quality ingredients, it’s no wonder there’s usually a long wait to get in.

8. Liuyishou Hotpot Seattle

Copy Link
1644 140th Ave NE
Bellevue, WA 98005
(425) 643-9050
Visit Website

The sauce bar is extensive and the range of items are expansive at this Bellevue outpost of the international chain, even offering standalone snacks like fruit and peanuts for customers to munch on. A couple of highlights are the perfectly tender marbled beef and the Kung Fu sliced potatoes, which are wafer thin and absorb immense amount of broths.

9. Swish Swish

Copy Link
14603 NE 20th St #5c
Bellevue, WA 98007
(425) 644-3545
Visit Website

This shabu-shabu place in Bellevue provides diners with broths ranging anywhere from the tongue numbing (mala) Sichuan spicy, to the earthy flavors of the spicy curry. Tender wagyu beef is one of the more notable meat options, served with an accompanying soup base in a pot made entirely out of a piece of paper. Originally created in Japan, this kami-nabe, helps to absorb some of the oils in the soup, keeping it light as more of the fatty wagyu is dipped in.

10. Shaburina

Copy Link
2720 152nd Ave NE #130
Redmond, WA 98052
(425) 658-7185
Visit Website

This Redmond restaurant is an all-you-can-eat, Japanese shabu-shabu hot pot restaurant, a form that emphasizes lighter and more quickly cooked ingredients. While orders of meat need to be placed with a server, this dining experience is enhanced by the self-service buffet bar in the back which contains various vegetables, noodles, and sauces. Broths such as soy milk and sukiyaki — a bold, sweet, and salty soy-based Japanese base — offer Eastside hot pot fans something a little different.

Loading comments...

1. Boiling Point

610 5th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104
Hot Pot King’s steaming “House Special” with stinky tofu.
“House Special” with tofu at Hot Pot King.
Jay Friedman for Eater

This Taiwanese shop in the International District specializes in serving a more passive version of hot pot where, instead of providing diners with raw ingredients, the pot is filled to the brim with precooked items and reheated at the table. The house special is the real draw, and features ingredients such as pork intestines, pork blood cake, and fermented tofu.

610 5th Ave S
Seattle, WA 98104

2. Chengdu Memory

520 S Jackson St, Seattle, WA 98104
A stone hot pot near a side of raw meat at Chengdu Memory.
Chengdu Memory has yin-yang bowls separating different types of broth.
Jay Friedman for Eater

Fans of spicy broths should go for the strong, mala soup base at this relative newcomer to the International District. The Chengdu Three Treasures dish comes with beef aorta, tripe, and omasum, meats that are not readily available at most hot pot shops in Seattle. Pro tip: the sweet potato noodles soak up the broth best.

520 S Jackson St
Seattle, WA 98104

3. Little Sheep Mongolian Hot Pot

609 S Weller St, Seattle, WA 98104
The regular and spicy broths in a silver bowl at Little Sheep.
The regular and spicy broths at Little Sheep.
Jay Friedman for Eater

This international chain — with outposts in the International District and Bellevue — takes a slightly different tack than similar places by not really encouraging DIY meat and vegetable sauce dipping. But the restaurant adds so many different herbs to its soup bases, creating a fragrant, rich, and aromatic broth, that it really doesn’t matter. Servings of lamb, a Mongolian hot pot staple, rounds out the experience.

609 S Weller St
Seattle, WA 98104

4. Gourmet Noodle Bowl

707 8th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104

This International District mainstay offers both all-you-can-eat and individual hot pot options. The soup bases are mild and light, the portions are large, and the prices are affordable. It’s also worth noting that the tables are supplied with plenty of garlic, peanut sauce, and most importantly, “Sha Cha Jiang” (Taiwanese barbecue sauce), a cornerstone to any Taiwanese hot pot experience.

707 8th Ave S
Seattle, WA 98104

5. Hot Pot King

710 8th Ave S #3006, Seattle, WA 98104

This International District spot serves up Chongqing-style hot pot (a beef tallow-based soup, turned red from the addition of chilis and Sichuan peppers) with a choice of two different soup bases, original or spicy. Spice levels range from 1-10, but be warned — upping it may result in a broth that’s a bit too extreme for the uninitiated. Chunks of beef fat in animal shaped molds provide diners with a playful way to increase their broths’ richness and flavor content.

710 8th Ave S #3006
Seattle, WA 98104

6. Morfire

1806 12th Ave Suite 100, Seattle, WA 98122

Morfire in Capitol Hill fills in a major gap in Seattle’s Thai food scene through its hot pot, or suki, offerings. The broths are accompanied by sauces that give off sweet and sour flavors, with unmistakable heat shining through. Don’t forget to try the Suki Hang, or dry hot pot, which features stir-fried glass noodles mixed with a spicy sauce from Thai chili peppers, all served up on a sizzling cast iron pan. There’s a delicate sweetness from a hint of preserved bean curd.

1806 12th Ave Suite 100
Seattle, WA 98122

7. The Dolar Shop

11020 NE 6th St #90, Bellevue, WA 98004

Bellevue’s high-end hot pot restaurant (part of a global chain) serves thick-cut wagyu beef and A5 Japanese Miyazaki beef, while the seafood options include live crab and geoduck. With a sauce bar containing 21 different options, rich broths, and high-quality ingredients, it’s no wonder there’s usually a long wait to get in.

11020 NE 6th St #90
Bellevue, WA 98004

8. Liuyishou Hotpot Seattle

1644 140th Ave NE, Bellevue, WA 98005

The sauce bar is extensive and the range of items are expansive at this Bellevue outpost of the international chain, even offering standalone snacks like fruit and peanuts for customers to munch on. A couple of highlights are the perfectly tender marbled beef and the Kung Fu sliced potatoes, which are wafer thin and absorb immense amount of broths.

1644 140th Ave NE
Bellevue, WA 98005

9. Swish Swish

14603 NE 20th St #5c, Bellevue, WA 98007

This shabu-shabu place in Bellevue provides diners with broths ranging anywhere from the tongue numbing (mala) Sichuan spicy, to the earthy flavors of the spicy curry. Tender wagyu beef is one of the more notable meat options, served with an accompanying soup base in a pot made entirely out of a piece of paper. Originally created in Japan, this kami-nabe, helps to absorb some of the oils in the soup, keeping it light as more of the fatty wagyu is dipped in.

14603 NE 20th St #5c
Bellevue, WA 98007

10. Shaburina

2720 152nd Ave NE #130, Redmond, WA 98052

This Redmond restaurant is an all-you-can-eat, Japanese shabu-shabu hot pot restaurant, a form that emphasizes lighter and more quickly cooked ingredients. While orders of meat need to be placed with a server, this dining experience is enhanced by the self-service buffet bar in the back which contains various vegetables, noodles, and sauces. Broths such as soy milk and sukiyaki — a bold, sweet, and salty soy-based Japanese base — offer Eastside hot pot fans something a little different.

2720 152nd Ave NE #130
Redmond, WA 98052

Related Maps