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An espresso and coffee counter with white trimming and a sky-blue surface, with a refrigerator full of drinks to the side.
The coffee counter at Ballard’s Sabine Cafe & Market.
Courtesy of Sabine

Where to Find Seattle’s Most Essential Brunches

With chicken and waffles, beef-rib pho, sake bloody marys, and more

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The coffee counter at Ballard’s Sabine Cafe & Market.
| Courtesy of Sabine

Seattle takes brunch seriously. Some of its most prominent restaurants, like the nationally recognized Filipino restaurant Musang and “Seattle soul” sensation Communion, offer brunch services that are sometimes booked out weeks in advance. But at the same time, you can still get their fix of hashbrowns, eggs, and bacon, at classic diners like Geraldine’s Counter in Columbia City, or at Luna Park Cafe in West Seattle. Or, for the best hangover cure in the city, slouch over a bowl of broth, noodles, and massive beef ribs at Pho Bac Súp Shop in Little Saigon. The following 17 spots provide a good survey of essential brunch spots in Seattle for diners of every taste.

Know of a spot that should be on our radar? Send us a tip by emailing seattle@eater.com. As usual, this list is not ranked; it’s organized geographically.

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El Parche Colombiano

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This Colombian restaurant up in the Northgate area has an all-day menu of lovingly crafted comfort food. Among the items on the brunch side of things are the bandeja paisa, with grilled skirt steak, chicharron, chorizo, sweet plantains, and an egg. And the empanadas, made with shatteringly crisp fried corn dough, are also supremely satisfying.

A brunch dish of eggs, rice, beans, and avocado from El Parche Colombiano
El Parche Colombiano has a selection of satisfying brunch plates.
El Parche/Facebook

Watson's Counter

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Ballard’s Korean-influenced restaurant serves swoon-worthy coffee and Instagram-ready French toast, which has the perfect combination of crunchiness and sweetness thanks to its cereal-coated crust. Those with a strong appetite may want to tackle the barbecue plate, with roasted pork, ssamjang, and various kimchi, or the satisfying loco moco.

Rachel's Bagels & Burritos

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Formerly the much-loved Porkchop & Co, this Ballard shop was reborn as a bagel spot during the pandemic. These perfectly chewy bagels are excellent across the board, with offerings like bagels topped with za’atar and shichimi togarashi (a Japanese chili pepper and spice blend). There are also great bagel sandwich options, like the Nick and Nora, a riff on avocado toast with chili crisp. Beyond bagels, the shop serves a few satisfying one-pound breakfast burritos with fillings like Oaxacan cheese and guajillo chili salsa, and J Kenji López-Alt-approved biscuit sandwiches.

Anything goes at this sprawling, boisterous restaurant in Ballard serving dishes like loco moco with crispy char siu pork, shrimp and grits with bell pepper sofrito, and pork belly steam buns with gochujang mayo. The creative twists to classics continue with the drinks menu, where sake makes an appearance in the bloody mary, and Coca-Cola blends with cherry wine and vanilla tincture for a boozy version of a childhood favorite. The food here is well worth some jockeying, but it’s best to get a reservation beforehand.

Sabine Café & Market

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Ballard’s Sabine is a great spot to have brunch on Sundays before or after wandering the Ballard Farmers Market. There’s a covered, heated, patio with decorated with palm fronds, a Mediterranean-style indoor area with sky-blue arches behind the bar, and an excellent brunch menu. Food includes a shockingly complex gluten-free steel-cut oat pancake served with apple butter and hazelnut dukkah, satisfying breakfast sandwiches, house-baked pita, and hummus (which is often served as a breakfast food in the Levant.) Sabine also serves fresh-squeezed juices, espresso and coffee, and cocktails from a full bar.

Stoneburner

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This Ballard favorite’s brunch menu has a variety of all-day fare dinner items (hearty salads, roasted veggies, pizzas), along with breakfast food. Standouts include the dutch baby, served in a cast iron pan and topped with orange chili agrodolce and the grilled porchetta with fried eggs, salsa verde, and crispy potatoes.

China Harbor Restaurant

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The massive black rectangle next to Lake Union on Westlake Avenue is instantly recognizable — if not a little out of place. A new chef is breathing fresh life into the nearly 30-year-old restaurant inside, turning it into a veritable dining destination. Chef Danna Hwang puts her own twists on classic Chinese dim sum dishes, crafting beautiful bites that are as ornate as the dining room decor: deep-fried taro balls filled with abalone, pan-fried chive dumplings, crispy pork belly in shrimp sauce, and more.

Tilikum Place Café

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Despite its proximity to Seattle Center and the Space Needle, this wildly popular cafe is no tourist trap, but rather, but a favorite among locals. With a European feel and an eclectic menu, the restaurant also has one definitive star: the Dutch baby pancake, whose cast iron-baked goodness has earned fame, far and wide.

COMMUNION Restaurant & Bar

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Should you manage to score a coveted spot at one Seattle’s buzziest restaurants, your hard work will be well rewarded. The brunch here reflects chef Kristi Brown’s perspective on Seattle soul food, an artful combination of Southern, Asian, and Northwest fare. Prawns and cheese grits and corn bread French toast are a couple of the highlights. The food, drinks, and service are without pretention despite the restaurant’s growing list of accolades — which is just how chef Brown and her son, Damon Bomar, want it to be. 

Cafe Campagne

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This Pike Place Market mainstay pays obsessive attention to classic French cuisine. Even the decor exudes the spirit of a Parisian cafe, down to the people-watching patio in front. Brunch is long and leisurely, with tables available from 9 a.m. to 3 and 4 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays, respectively. There are loads of simple pleasures here, like the baguette with French-style butter and jam, and more decadent wonders, like the Oeufs en Meurette, a dish of poached eggs, red wine-foie gras sauce, pearl onions, and bacon.

Fat's Chicken and Waffles

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The stars at this Central District favorite (which recently reopened for dine-in) are the honey butter chicken biscuit sandwich and the restaurant’s namesake sampler, with two pieces of chicken served alongside fried green tomatoes, cheese grits, and garlic toast. Brunch is popular and the restaurant can feel hectic, but the warm service and fantastic food are worth it.

Pho Bac Súp Shop

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Pho might be the best hangover cure humans have ever created, its rich bone broth settling the stomach and restoring depleted nutrients in the body, especially when the broth is as deep and complex as the one found at Yenvy Pham’s Little Saigon restaurant, and especially when its topped with a massive beef rib covered in fat and collagen. Luckily, Pho Bac Súp Shop opens at 10 am., and you can pair your bowl of noodles with some Chinese donuts and a cup of Vietnamese coffee to round out the experience.

The flavors of the Philippines meet Northwest ingredients at this nationally recognized Beacon Hill restaurant set inside a craftsman house. Brunch wields these flavors with the same expertise as dinner, and servers patiently educate anyone unfamiliar with the dishes. The short rib kare kare, with eggplant, okra, and peanut butter, is one recurring standout. And the silog — a classic breakfast dish of fried rice and heaps of garlic — comes with two rotating variations each week. There’s also a good selection of vegetarian, vegan, and dairy- and gluten-free dishes, too.

Luna Park Cafe

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Luna Park Cafe is a funky local favorite near the historic site of the amusement park from which it took its name (the park closed in 1913, but the cafe opened in 1989), and the still-closed West Seattle bridge. Luna Park serves American diner food like omelettes, steak and eggs, hashes, French toast, pancakes, milkshakes, and more. Eat on the patio on a sunny day, or check out the retro memorabilia indoors, including old-fashioned jukebox selections at every booth. Luna Park offers dine-in, takeout, and delivery through Doordash. Breakfast is served all-day, every day, from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Easy Street Records & Cafe

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This not-so-secret diner inside West Seattle’s iconic record shop serves what’s perhaps the neighborhood’s best breakfast and brunch menu — and possibly its most affordable. Music-themed items available for pickup include for the New Wave-Os Rancheros, the Notorious B&G (biscuits and gravy), and the Johnny Cash special (steak and eggs).

Geraldine's Counter Restaurant

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This Columbia City classic is renowned for its French toast, but its scrambles, omelets, and hashes are no slouches either. The diner also has some brunch cocktails, as well as crab Benedicts and chicken fried steak with pork sausage gravy. If there’s a long wait, diners may want to consider to-go orders to eat on the neighborhood’s nearby outdoor patio.

Super Six

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The brunch at this well-loved Hawaiian-Korean restaurant (part of the Marination family) serves up delectable dishes, such as fried chicken on bubble waffles, loco moco, pancakes with toasted macadamia butter, and some fine malasadas, best enjoyed on the expansive patio. Don’t forget about the lemongrass bloody marys, which are seriously strong.

El Parche Colombiano

A brunch dish of eggs, rice, beans, and avocado from El Parche Colombiano
El Parche Colombiano has a selection of satisfying brunch plates.
El Parche/Facebook

This Colombian restaurant up in the Northgate area has an all-day menu of lovingly crafted comfort food. Among the items on the brunch side of things are the bandeja paisa, with grilled skirt steak, chicharron, chorizo, sweet plantains, and an egg. And the empanadas, made with shatteringly crisp fried corn dough, are also supremely satisfying.

A brunch dish of eggs, rice, beans, and avocado from El Parche Colombiano
El Parche Colombiano has a selection of satisfying brunch plates.
El Parche/Facebook

Watson's Counter

Ballard’s Korean-influenced restaurant serves swoon-worthy coffee and Instagram-ready French toast, which has the perfect combination of crunchiness and sweetness thanks to its cereal-coated crust. Those with a strong appetite may want to tackle the barbecue plate, with roasted pork, ssamjang, and various kimchi, or the satisfying loco moco.

Rachel's Bagels & Burritos

Formerly the much-loved Porkchop & Co, this Ballard shop was reborn as a bagel spot during the pandemic. These perfectly chewy bagels are excellent across the board, with offerings like bagels topped with za’atar and shichimi togarashi (a Japanese chili pepper and spice blend). There are also great bagel sandwich options, like the Nick and Nora, a riff on avocado toast with chili crisp. Beyond bagels, the shop serves a few satisfying one-pound breakfast burritos with fillings like Oaxacan cheese and guajillo chili salsa, and J Kenji López-Alt-approved biscuit sandwiches.

Sawyer

Anything goes at this sprawling, boisterous restaurant in Ballard serving dishes like loco moco with crispy char siu pork, shrimp and grits with bell pepper sofrito, and pork belly steam buns with gochujang mayo. The creative twists to classics continue with the drinks menu, where sake makes an appearance in the bloody mary, and Coca-Cola blends with cherry wine and vanilla tincture for a boozy version of a childhood favorite. The food here is well worth some jockeying, but it’s best to get a reservation beforehand.

Sabine Café & Market

Ballard’s Sabine is a great spot to have brunch on Sundays before or after wandering the Ballard Farmers Market. There’s a covered, heated, patio with decorated with palm fronds, a Mediterranean-style indoor area with sky-blue arches behind the bar, and an excellent brunch menu. Food includes a shockingly complex gluten-free steel-cut oat pancake served with apple butter and hazelnut dukkah, satisfying breakfast sandwiches, house-baked pita, and hummus (which is often served as a breakfast food in the Levant.) Sabine also serves fresh-squeezed juices, espresso and coffee, and cocktails from a full bar.

Stoneburner

This Ballard favorite’s brunch menu has a variety of all-day fare dinner items (hearty salads, roasted veggies, pizzas), along with breakfast food. Standouts include the dutch baby, served in a cast iron pan and topped with orange chili agrodolce and the grilled porchetta with fried eggs, salsa verde, and crispy potatoes.

China Harbor Restaurant

The massive black rectangle next to Lake Union on Westlake Avenue is instantly recognizable — if not a little out of place. A new chef is breathing fresh life into the nearly 30-year-old restaurant inside, turning it into a veritable dining destination. Chef Danna Hwang puts her own twists on classic Chinese dim sum dishes, crafting beautiful bites that are as ornate as the dining room decor: deep-fried taro balls filled with abalone, pan-fried chive dumplings, crispy pork belly in shrimp sauce, and more.

Tilikum Place Café

Despite its proximity to Seattle Center and the Space Needle, this wildly popular cafe is no tourist trap, but rather, but a favorite among locals. With a European feel and an eclectic menu, the restaurant also has one definitive star: the Dutch baby pancake, whose cast iron-baked goodness has earned fame, far and wide.

COMMUNION Restaurant & Bar

Should you manage to score a coveted spot at one Seattle’s buzziest restaurants, your hard work will be well rewarded. The brunch here reflects chef Kristi Brown’s perspective on Seattle soul food, an artful combination of Southern, Asian, and Northwest fare. Prawns and cheese grits and corn bread French toast are a couple of the highlights. The food, drinks, and service are without pretention despite the restaurant’s growing list of accolades — which is just how chef Brown and her son, Damon Bomar, want it to be. 

Cafe Campagne

This Pike Place Market mainstay pays obsessive attention to classic French cuisine. Even the decor exudes the spirit of a Parisian cafe, down to the people-watching patio in front. Brunch is long and leisurely, with tables available from 9 a.m. to 3 and 4 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays, respectively. There are loads of simple pleasures here, like the baguette with French-style butter and jam, and more decadent wonders, like the Oeufs en Meurette, a dish of poached eggs, red wine-foie gras sauce, pearl onions, and bacon.

Fat's Chicken and Waffles

The stars at this Central District favorite (which recently reopened for dine-in) are the honey butter chicken biscuit sandwich and the restaurant’s namesake sampler, with two pieces of chicken served alongside fried green tomatoes, cheese grits, and garlic toast. Brunch is popular and the restaurant can feel hectic, but the warm service and fantastic food are worth it.

Pho Bac Súp Shop

Pho might be the best hangover cure humans have ever created, its rich bone broth settling the stomach and restoring depleted nutrients in the body, especially when the broth is as deep and complex as the one found at Yenvy Pham’s Little Saigon restaurant, and especially when its topped with a massive beef rib covered in fat and collagen. Luckily, Pho Bac Súp Shop opens at 10 am., and you can pair your bowl of noodles with some Chinese donuts and a cup of Vietnamese coffee to round out the experience.

Musang

The flavors of the Philippines meet Northwest ingredients at this nationally recognized Beacon Hill restaurant set inside a craftsman house. Brunch wields these flavors with the same expertise as dinner, and servers patiently educate anyone unfamiliar with the dishes. The short rib kare kare, with eggplant, okra, and peanut butter, is one recurring standout. And the silog — a classic breakfast dish of fried rice and heaps of garlic — comes with two rotating variations each week. There’s also a good selection of vegetarian, vegan, and dairy- and gluten-free dishes, too.

Luna Park Cafe

Luna Park Cafe is a funky local favorite near the historic site of the amusement park from which it took its name (the park closed in 1913, but the cafe opened in 1989), and the still-closed West Seattle bridge. Luna Park serves American diner food like omelettes, steak and eggs, hashes, French toast, pancakes, milkshakes, and more. Eat on the patio on a sunny day, or check out the retro memorabilia indoors, including old-fashioned jukebox selections at every booth. Luna Park offers dine-in, takeout, and delivery through Doordash. Breakfast is served all-day, every day, from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Easy Street Records & Cafe

This not-so-secret diner inside West Seattle’s iconic record shop serves what’s perhaps the neighborhood’s best breakfast and brunch menu — and possibly its most affordable. Music-themed items available for pickup include for the New Wave-Os Rancheros, the Notorious B&G (biscuits and gravy), and the Johnny Cash special (steak and eggs).

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Geraldine's Counter Restaurant

This Columbia City classic is renowned for its French toast, but its scrambles, omelets, and hashes are no slouches either. The diner also has some brunch cocktails, as well as crab Benedicts and chicken fried steak with pork sausage gravy. If there’s a long wait, diners may want to consider to-go orders to eat on the neighborhood’s nearby outdoor patio.

Super Six

The brunch at this well-loved Hawaiian-Korean restaurant (part of the Marination family) serves up delectable dishes, such as fried chicken on bubble waffles, loco moco, pancakes with toasted macadamia butter, and some fine malasadas, best enjoyed on the expansive patio. Don’t forget about the lemongrass bloody marys, which are seriously strong.

Related Maps