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Four plates of food: mango chicken curry, lamb curry roti, blackened shrimp curry, and jack fruit curry, on a pink table.
Various versions of kottu roti (curry fried with chopped flatbread) at Syd Suntha’s new Sri Lankan food cart.
Suzi Pratt/Eater Seattle

17 Incredible Indian and South Asian Restaurants in the Seattle Area

With kottu roti, enormous dosas, soft-serve ice cream, and more

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Various versions of kottu roti (curry fried with chopped flatbread) at Syd Suntha’s new Sri Lankan food cart.
| Suzi Pratt/Eater Seattle

The Seattle area’s South Asian food scene is quickly starting to represent a wide variety of regions and countries, with some restaurants offering innovative American and Pacific Northwest takes on Indian, Pakistani, and Sri Lankan cuisine. Good South Indian dosas have been available in the area for some years, but newcomers are increasing options with three-foot-long crepes studded with chopped onions in Bothell and and affordable, fast-food-style, potato-stuffed dosas in Bellevue. Meanwhile, Rupee Bar in Ballard has been serving Sri Lankan drinking snacks like prawns with chili paste and bottarga (a type of fish roe) since 2020. And Karachi Cowboys in Capitol Hill (opened in 2021) serves inventive dishes that combine elements of Pakistani and Texan cuisine with dishes like aloo sliders made with Hawaiian rolls and tamarind barbecue sauce. Here are some favorite South Asian and Indian restaurants from around the Seattle area. As usual, this list is not ranked; it’s organized geographically.

Know of a spot that should be on our radar? Send us a tip by emailing seattle@eater.com.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Rupee Bar

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This Ballard bar and kitchen is led by Elisabeth Kenyon, previously of Manolin, who crafts an assortment of Sri Lankan and South Indian snacks like egg rolls stuffed with lamb and potato curry, tomato, and curry leaf, and yogurt-marinated spiced fried chicken. The cocktail menu includes South Asian ingredients like toasted coriander seeds, turmeric, and tamarind date chutney. The bar won a James Beard award for best design for restaurants with under 75 seats in 2020.

This new Sri Lankan food truck has been wowing Seattle diners with excellent kottu roti, a stir fry of chopped flatbread, curry, vegetables, and spices, for the last few months. The dish — something like fried rice made with bits of bread rather than grains of rice — combines the richness of long-cooked cuts of meat with the high-heat flavor of the flattop and the curry leaf, cardamom, and mustard seed flavors of Sri Lanka. Owner Syd Suntha is active in the pop-up scene, and the food truck pops up at events and breweries all over Seattle. Stay updated on Kottu’s Instagram.

Four plates of food: mango chicken curry, lamb curry roti, blackened shrimp curry, and jack fruit curry, on a pink table.
Various versions of kottu roti (curry fried with chopped flatbread) at Syd Suntha’s new Sri Lankan food cart.
Suzi Pratt/Eater Seattle

After building a strong following as a pop-up inside Fremont’s Pomerol, the contemporary Indian tasting menu specialist Meesha became a full-fledged restaurant in 2020. Among some of the can’t-miss dishes from chef Preeti Agarwal are rarah keema pao with expertly prepared ground lamb, the fried Amritsari fish, and the paneer in tomato sauce with black cardamom. Takeout is still an option, but the lively dining room and patio are also open for business.

Lassi and Spice

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South Lake Union’s Indian-influenced cafe serves up variations on the classic lassi, a tangy-sweet Indian yogurt drink. Flavors range from blueberry cardamom to pistachio and the café serves up a number of snacks and Indian sweets to pair it with. Those lassis and an assortment of small dishes and sweet treats such as ladoo are available for takeout and delivery.

Saffron Grill

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Saffron Grill has is one of the best-loved Indian restaurants in the city. Serving up a fusion of Indian and Mediterranean cuisine, the Northgate spot exudes a family friendly vibe in both its service and its menu. Classic dishes such as the mango chutney chicken curry fare well, but the real winners are the delectable okra masala and the wide assortment of desserts.

Nirmal's

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Pioneer Square’s Indian food destination restaurant serves soups, biryani, and curries from a variety of regions, and happily caters to pescatarians and vegetarians with items like paneer-stuffed bell pepper with spicy tomato sauce. Owners Oliver and Gita Bangera have always made sure the takeout service is as robust as the dine-in experience — although seeing the gregarious Oliver in person usually adds a spark to the meal.

Taste of India

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Before the recent influx of excellent regional Indian restaurants, Taste of India was considered by many to be the best Indian food in the city. There are a ton of brag-worthy items on the menu, including a creamy, satisfying butter chicken, but perhaps none more so than the naan (try the paneer or spinach options).

A bird’s eye view of an Indian dish with tomato sauce and vegetables.
The soups, curries, and masalas at Taste of India are among the best in the city.
Taste of India/Official

Karachi Cowboy

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This Indo-Pakistani-Texan food pop-up landed a brick-and-mortar location in Capitol Hill this summer. Chef Nasir Zubair and his wife Nicole Greenwald have filled out the dinner menu with offerings like aloo sliders, chana masala, and kheema — halal ground beef simmered with spices and sweet green peas. The menu is inspired by Zubair’s Pakistani and African American ancestry and his upbringing in Texas. Follow Karachi Cowboys’ Instagram account for the most current specials.

Spice Waala

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The Capitol Hill outpost of Uttam Mukherjee and Aakanksha Sinha’s Indian street food business, which started as a farmer’s market stall, serves kathi rolls made with roti wrapped around piles of paneer, potato, spicy chicken, and juicy lamb kebabs, whose rich flavors pair perfectly with a tangy mango lassi. Spice Waala also recently started serving soft-serve ice cream with Indian-inspired flavors like rose-cardamom and pistachio-cardamom.

Kricket Club

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Kricket Club is chef Preeti Agarwal’s follow-up to her Fremont Indian restaurant Meesha. It’s a similar concept: tapas-style small plates and entrees served family style. Located in the old Salare space in Ravenna, Kricket Club looks to New Delhi and Mumbai for inspiration for its street food, from the masala potato papadi chaat to spiced puffed lotus seeds. Bigger dinner portions include a goat biryani and a lentil rice risotto. Cocktails are tweaked with South Asian ingredients including a mezcal drink with pomegranate, harissa and rose. The single malts and scotch are a good deal here too, with 2-ounce pours that cost $2-$3 less than what you would pay at bars on Capitol Hill and in Ballard.

Kathakali Indian Cuisine

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This South Indian spot in Kirkland draws critical raves for its Kerala-influenced cuisine, with a menu that sources local, organic ingredients when possible, and a kitchen that mills its own spices. The dosas, in particular, are part of the reason Kathakali is so well-liked. Online orders for pickup are accepted for lunch and dinner, every day but Monday.

Samburna Indian Restaurant

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Samburna serves some of the Seattle area’s best South Indian cusine. The owners of the restaurant grew up in Tamil Nadu, on the Southern tip of the Indian Subcontinent, where dosa is a staple, and the restaurant serves several excellent versions, including one that’s over three feet in length; all dosas are served with sambar and a variety of chutneys. The goat curry is also a must-try, and madras coffee with a milk-based dessert makes a nice end to the meal. Order Samburna to go, or enjoy a meal with quick service in the dining room.

A dosa on a metal tray with sambar and various chutneys.
A potato-stuffed masala dosa from Samburna restaurant.
Madhi Oli

Naan ‘N’ Curry

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Somewhat of a hidden gem, this Renton spot (with a location in Issaquah as well) is a great choice for those looking for some quality Indian and Pakistani dishes, from fantastic biryani and paneer to mouthwatering baalti gosht (meat tossed with diced onion and tomatoes in a black pepper, onion, and garlic sauce).

Momo & Pizza Ghar

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Since opening in 2019 as possibly the only spot on the Eastside serving momos (Nepalese dumplings), Momo & Pizza Ghar’s menu has supplied a whole gamut of Nepalese foods: dumplings, Kathmandu pizza, fiery goat sekuwa (a Nepalese wood-fired technique), and more. Obviously, the momos are a highlight — pick vegetable, paneer, or chicken fillings, and select from steamed, fried, sauced, and chili-laden preparations. Nestled between Mayuri Bakery and Seoul Hot Pot on 152nd Ave NE, Momo & Pizza Ghar has limited dine-in seating and is open for take-out.

Dosa House Pure Vegetarian Indian Food

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Dosa House owner Ajay Kumar says he owns the only Indian fast-food restaurants in the Seattle area: Chaat House, Curry House and Dosa House. They’re also all 100% vegetarian and all in Bellevue. Dosa house serves a wide variety of dosas, including the classic potato-stuffed masala dosa and an Indo-Chinese “Schezwan Noodle Dosa” (stuffed with spicy, greasy chow mein) for around $10, and all of them are served with tomato, coconut and peanut chutneys, a side of sambar (lentil soup) and kheer (sweet milk with vermicelli) for dessert. 

Mayuri Indian Cuisine

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Open since 1996, Mayuri Indian Cuisine and its affiliated bakery and grocery stores have been integral to and indicative of the growth of the Eastside’s vibrant Desi population. Mayuri offers dishes from nearly the entire Indian subcontinent, from Kerala’s fiery dry-fried seafood and the gongura of Andhra Pradesh (various proteins, often goat, cooked in a sour sauce of red sorrel) to rich Mughlai gravies and sweet carrot halwa (a dessert pudding of gently cooked carrot, condensed milk, sugar, and cardamom). Mayuri’s ornate space sports a full bar as well, and is open for takeout and in-person lunch and dinner.

Maurya Indian Grocery and Cafe

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This cozy café and grocery store specializes in a variety of South Indian specials, including fried idlis and sambhar. The spicy Mysore masala dosa is an ongoing favorite. After eating, peruse the market for South Asian vegetables, fruits, snacks and pantry items.

A closeup view of a dish stewed in a red sauce, with sides of naan and rice in the background.
Maurya specializes in South Indian cuisine.
Maurya

Rupee Bar

This Ballard bar and kitchen is led by Elisabeth Kenyon, previously of Manolin, who crafts an assortment of Sri Lankan and South Indian snacks like egg rolls stuffed with lamb and potato curry, tomato, and curry leaf, and yogurt-marinated spiced fried chicken. The cocktail menu includes South Asian ingredients like toasted coriander seeds, turmeric, and tamarind date chutney. The bar won a James Beard award for best design for restaurants with under 75 seats in 2020.

Kottu

Four plates of food: mango chicken curry, lamb curry roti, blackened shrimp curry, and jack fruit curry, on a pink table.
Various versions of kottu roti (curry fried with chopped flatbread) at Syd Suntha’s new Sri Lankan food cart.
Suzi Pratt/Eater Seattle

This new Sri Lankan food truck has been wowing Seattle diners with excellent kottu roti, a stir fry of chopped flatbread, curry, vegetables, and spices, for the last few months. The dish — something like fried rice made with bits of bread rather than grains of rice — combines the richness of long-cooked cuts of meat with the high-heat flavor of the flattop and the curry leaf, cardamom, and mustard seed flavors of Sri Lanka. Owner Syd Suntha is active in the pop-up scene, and the food truck pops up at events and breweries all over Seattle. Stay updated on Kottu’s Instagram.

Four plates of food: mango chicken curry, lamb curry roti, blackened shrimp curry, and jack fruit curry, on a pink table.
Various versions of kottu roti (curry fried with chopped flatbread) at Syd Suntha’s new Sri Lankan food cart.
Suzi Pratt/Eater Seattle

Meesha

After building a strong following as a pop-up inside Fremont’s Pomerol, the contemporary Indian tasting menu specialist Meesha became a full-fledged restaurant in 2020. Among some of the can’t-miss dishes from chef Preeti Agarwal are rarah keema pao with expertly prepared ground lamb, the fried Amritsari fish, and the paneer in tomato sauce with black cardamom. Takeout is still an option, but the lively dining room and patio are also open for business.

Lassi and Spice

South Lake Union’s Indian-influenced cafe serves up variations on the classic lassi, a tangy-sweet Indian yogurt drink. Flavors range from blueberry cardamom to pistachio and the café serves up a number of snacks and Indian sweets to pair it with. Those lassis and an assortment of small dishes and sweet treats such as ladoo are available for takeout and delivery.

Saffron Grill

Saffron Grill has is one of the best-loved Indian restaurants in the city. Serving up a fusion of Indian and Mediterranean cuisine, the Northgate spot exudes a family friendly vibe in both its service and its menu. Classic dishes such as the mango chutney chicken curry fare well, but the real winners are the delectable okra masala and the wide assortment of desserts.

Nirmal's

Pioneer Square’s Indian food destination restaurant serves soups, biryani, and curries from a variety of regions, and happily caters to pescatarians and vegetarians with items like paneer-stuffed bell pepper with spicy tomato sauce. Owners Oliver and Gita Bangera have always made sure the takeout service is as robust as the dine-in experience — although seeing the gregarious Oliver in person usually adds a spark to the meal.

Taste of India

A bird’s eye view of an Indian dish with tomato sauce and vegetables.
The soups, curries, and masalas at Taste of India are among the best in the city.
Taste of India/Official

Before the recent influx of excellent regional Indian restaurants, Taste of India was considered by many to be the best Indian food in the city. There are a ton of brag-worthy items on the menu, including a creamy, satisfying butter chicken, but perhaps none more so than the naan (try the paneer or spinach options).

A bird’s eye view of an Indian dish with tomato sauce and vegetables.
The soups, curries, and masalas at Taste of India are among the best in the city.
Taste of India/Official

Karachi Cowboy

This Indo-Pakistani-Texan food pop-up landed a brick-and-mortar location in Capitol Hill this summer. Chef Nasir Zubair and his wife Nicole Greenwald have filled out the dinner menu with offerings like aloo sliders, chana masala, and kheema — halal ground beef simmered with spices and sweet green peas. The menu is inspired by Zubair’s Pakistani and African American ancestry and his upbringing in Texas. Follow Karachi Cowboys’ Instagram account for the most current specials.

Spice Waala

The Capitol Hill outpost of Uttam Mukherjee and Aakanksha Sinha’s Indian street food business, which started as a farmer’s market stall, serves kathi rolls made with roti wrapped around piles of paneer, potato, spicy chicken, and juicy lamb kebabs, whose rich flavors pair perfectly with a tangy mango lassi. Spice Waala also recently started serving soft-serve ice cream with Indian-inspired flavors like rose-cardamom and pistachio-cardamom.

Kricket Club

Kricket Club is chef Preeti Agarwal’s follow-up to her Fremont Indian restaurant Meesha. It’s a similar concept: tapas-style small plates and entrees served family style. Located in the old Salare space in Ravenna, Kricket Club looks to New Delhi and Mumbai for inspiration for its street food, from the masala potato papadi chaat to spiced puffed lotus seeds. Bigger dinner portions include a goat biryani and a lentil rice risotto. Cocktails are tweaked with South Asian ingredients including a mezcal drink with pomegranate, harissa and rose. The single malts and scotch are a good deal here too, with 2-ounce pours that cost $2-$3 less than what you would pay at bars on Capitol Hill and in Ballard.

Kathakali Indian Cuisine

This South Indian spot in Kirkland draws critical raves for its Kerala-influenced cuisine, with a menu that sources local, organic ingredients when possible, and a kitchen that mills its own spices. The dosas, in particular, are part of the reason Kathakali is so well-liked. Online orders for pickup are accepted for lunch and dinner, every day but Monday.

Samburna Indian Restaurant

A dosa on a metal tray with sambar and various chutneys.
A potato-stuffed masala dosa from Samburna restaurant.
Madhi Oli

Samburna serves some of the Seattle area’s best South Indian cusine. The owners of the restaurant grew up in Tamil Nadu, on the Southern tip of the Indian Subcontinent, where dosa is a staple, and the restaurant serves several excellent versions, including one that’s over three feet in length; all dosas are served with sambar and a variety of chutneys. The goat curry is also a must-try, and madras coffee with a milk-based dessert makes a nice end to the meal. Order Samburna to go, or enjoy a meal with quick service in the dining room.

A dosa on a metal tray with sambar and various chutneys.
A potato-stuffed masala dosa from Samburna restaurant.
Madhi Oli

Naan ‘N’ Curry

Somewhat of a hidden gem, this Renton spot (with a location in Issaquah as well) is a great choice for those looking for some quality Indian and Pakistani dishes, from fantastic biryani and paneer to mouthwatering baalti gosht (meat tossed with diced onion and tomatoes in a black pepper, onion, and garlic sauce).

Momo & Pizza Ghar

Since opening in 2019 as possibly the only spot on the Eastside serving momos (Nepalese dumplings), Momo & Pizza Ghar’s menu has supplied a whole gamut of Nepalese foods: dumplings, Kathmandu pizza, fiery goat sekuwa (a Nepalese wood-fired technique), and more. Obviously, the momos are a highlight — pick vegetable, paneer, or chicken fillings, and select from steamed, fried, sauced, and chili-laden preparations. Nestled between Mayuri Bakery and Seoul Hot Pot on 152nd Ave NE, Momo & Pizza Ghar has limited dine-in seating and is open for take-out.

Dosa House Pure Vegetarian Indian Food

Dosa House owner Ajay Kumar says he owns the only Indian fast-food restaurants in the Seattle area: Chaat House, Curry House and Dosa House. They’re also all 100% vegetarian and all in Bellevue. Dosa house serves a wide variety of dosas, including the classic potato-stuffed masala dosa and an Indo-Chinese “Schezwan Noodle Dosa” (stuffed with spicy, greasy chow mein) for around $10, and all of them are served with tomato, coconut and peanut chutneys, a side of sambar (lentil soup) and kheer (sweet milk with vermicelli) for dessert. 

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Mayuri Indian Cuisine

Open since 1996, Mayuri Indian Cuisine and its affiliated bakery and grocery stores have been integral to and indicative of the growth of the Eastside’s vibrant Desi population. Mayuri offers dishes from nearly the entire Indian subcontinent, from Kerala’s fiery dry-fried seafood and the gongura of Andhra Pradesh (various proteins, often goat, cooked in a sour sauce of red sorrel) to rich Mughlai gravies and sweet carrot halwa (a dessert pudding of gently cooked carrot, condensed milk, sugar, and cardamom). Mayuri’s ornate space sports a full bar as well, and is open for takeout and in-person lunch and dinner.

Maurya Indian Grocery and Cafe

A closeup view of a dish stewed in a red sauce, with sides of naan and rice in the background.
Maurya specializes in South Indian cuisine.
Maurya

This cozy café and grocery store specializes in a variety of South Indian specials, including fried idlis and sambhar. The spicy Mysore masala dosa is an ongoing favorite. After eating, peruse the market for South Asian vegetables, fruits, snacks and pantry items.

A closeup view of a dish stewed in a red sauce, with sides of naan and rice in the background.
Maurya specializes in South Indian cuisine.
Maurya

Related Maps