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A bowl of thick ramen noodles in a dark-brown broth, topped with chunks of oxtail, a hard-boiled egg, and greens.
The Tokyo Shoyu Ramen at Rondo is served with oxtail meat and oxtail broth, lightened by mizuna greens.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Where to Get Comforting Bowls of Ramen in the Seattle Area

Tsukumen and hiyashi chuka are great warm-weather options to enjoy without breaking a sweat

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The Tokyo Shoyu Ramen at Rondo is served with oxtail meat and oxtail broth, lightened by mizuna greens.
| Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Ramen remains a classic comfort food, with variations like tsukemen and hiyashi chuka taking the noodles out of the soup to give the dish a year-round appeal. Seemingly everyone has an opinion about favorite types of broth, tare (flavoring), noodles, and toppings that comprise a bowl of ramen. But while ramen restaurants (and variations) abound in the Seattle area, the following eight restaurants are consistently some of the best places to slurp these Japanese noodles. Know of a spot that should be on our radar? Send us a tip by emailing seattle@eater.com. As usual, this list is not ranked; it’s organized geographically.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Midnite Ramen

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1144 NW 52nd St
Seattle, WA 98107
(206) 659-0082
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Operating out of a food truck you’ll find at selected local breweries, Midnite Ramen serves up a lively yatai (mobile food stall) experience. The base broth is on the light side, with tare (flavoring) added to create ramen varieties such as shoyu and miso. Particularly noteworthy is the onomichi ramen — while not as entrancingly bitter as niboshi (dried fish) broths in Japan, fish powder adds flavor while pork fatback lends lardy goodness and texture to the soup. Find the schedule on Midnite Ramen’s website.

A man wearing a white head scarf enters a small mobile food cart with red flags displaying Japanese characters and an orange glowing paper lantern out front.
Elmer Komagata brings practices from the Japanese yatai to Seattle.
Suzi Pratt/Eater Seattle

2. Yoroshiku Japanese Restaurant

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1913 N 45th St
Seattle, WA 98103
(206) 547-4649
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The shoyu and shio (salt) ramens at this Wallingford izakaya are both solid, but the true star of the menu is the miso ramen, with a depth of earthy flavor lent by the fermented soybean paste. The restaurant also has some of the fattiest pork of all the area’s ramen restaurants — so good it’s worth an upgrade to extra chashu. Yoroshiku also offers unusual options like a wagyu shoyu ramen and a Fisherman ramen featuring local seafood in miso broth.

A bowl of miso ramen topped with greens.
The miso ramen at Yoroshiku, an izakaya in Wallingford.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

3. Jinya Ramen Bar

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15600 NE 8th St
Bellevue, WA 98008
(425) 590-9548
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Jinya is a Japanese restaurant that found success in Los Angeles before spreading throughout North America. The customer base at the Bellevue branch is less Japanese than Chinese, who often prefer softer noodles, so ask for a shorter cooking time if you want a firmer noodle. The menu dances around a traditional tonkotsu preparation: The tonkotsu red comes closest to traditional (though with non-traditional thick noodles), while the tonkotsu black bursts with garlicky flavor.

A red bowl of tonkotsu spicy ramen with pork.
Tonkotsu spicy ramen
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

4. Rondo Japanese Kitchen

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224 Broadway E
Seattle, WA 98102
(206) 588-2051
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This Capitol Hill izakaya serves up “Tokyo Shoyu Ramen” that’s slightly beefy with oxtail meat and oxtail broth but lightened up with fish powder and mizuna. (Don’t worry; there’s also pork chashu in the bowl.) That same oxtail broth forms the base for black garlic tantan ramen spiked with sesame and sansho (a spice similar to Sichuan peppercorns), plus Chinese pickles. Those that want to go soupless can opt for the shoyu-flavored maze-men.

A bowl of thick ramen noodles in a dark-brown broth, topped with chunks of oxtail, a hard-boiled egg, and greens.
The Tokyo Shoyu Ramen at Rondo is served with oxtail meat and oxtail broth, lightened by mizuna greens.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

5. Ramen Danbo

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1222 E Pine St
Seattle, WA 98122
(206) 566-5479
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Ramen Danbo serves Hakata-style tonkotosu ramen, available in shio, miso, and negi-goma (scallion and toasted sesame) options. Diners can specify noodle thickness and firmness, thickness of broth, amount of lard, and amount of spicy sauce — though even a small amount of spicy sauce can dominate the flavor of the broth. If you’re feeling extra hungry, save some broth and order a portion of additional noodles, known in Japan as “kaedama.”

A bowl of tonkotsu ramen with pork, egg, and scallions, and a pair of chopsticks lifting up noodles.
Classic tonkotsu ramen
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

6. Ooink

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1416 Harvard Ave
Seattle, WA 98122
(206) 568-7669
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Ooink references chef-owner Chong Boon Ooi’s name and his signature silky pork broth, though he doesn’t call it tonkotsu. This inconspicuous spot serves some of Seattle’s best ramen, rich and wonderful from the variety of house-made tares and noodles. Shoyu is an excellent choice, while the spicy ramen (or spicy kotteri ramen) offers heat levels that get serious as you climb from one to four. Ayam goreng (Malaysian-spiced chicken) serves as a great side dish to a noodle bowl.

Shoyu pork ramen in a white and blue bowl topped with egg.
Shoyu silky pork ramen
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

7. Hokkaido Ramen Santouka

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103 Bellevue Way NE Ste 3
Bellevue, WA 98004
(425) 462-0141
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After opening several outlets in Japanese supermarkets in the United States and Canada, Santouka debuted its first free-standing American restaurant in Bellevue in 2014 and later expanded to University Village. This Japanese import serves up several varieties of high-quality tonkotsu ramen, with options including shoyu, miso, and spicy miso-flavored tonkotsu. But the simple shio (salt) ramen shows off the pork broth best. It’s also the only one that comes with a pickled red plum. The noodles aren’t the true straight type, but rather slightly wavy, catching more of the broth with each slurp.

A white bowl with tonoktsu shio ramen and chopsticks lifting noodles.
Tonkotsu shio ramen
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

8. Arashi Ramen

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17045 Southcenter Pkwy
Tukwila, WA 98188
(253) 220-8722
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Founded in Tukwila and expanded to Ballard, Arashi focuses on the tonkotsu-style ramen associated with the island of Kyushu in southern Japan. The porky broth is available in shio (salt), shoyu (soy sauce), miso, and spicy miso varieties, and black garlic is a good twist to the tonkotsu miso option. It doesn’t say on the menu, but you can (and should) customize your noodles’ firmness. Ask for firm (katamen) or extra firm (barikata) to avoid the default overcooking to slightly soft.

A black bowl filled with black ramen, topped with pork and and egg.
Black garlic (salt-based) ramen
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

1. Midnite Ramen

1144 NW 52nd St, Seattle, WA 98107
A man wearing a white head scarf enters a small mobile food cart with red flags displaying Japanese characters and an orange glowing paper lantern out front.
Elmer Komagata brings practices from the Japanese yatai to Seattle.
Suzi Pratt/Eater Seattle

Operating out of a food truck you’ll find at selected local breweries, Midnite Ramen serves up a lively yatai (mobile food stall) experience. The base broth is on the light side, with tare (flavoring) added to create ramen varieties such as shoyu and miso. Particularly noteworthy is the onomichi ramen — while not as entrancingly bitter as niboshi (dried fish) broths in Japan, fish powder adds flavor while pork fatback lends lardy goodness and texture to the soup. Find the schedule on Midnite Ramen’s website.

1144 NW 52nd St
Seattle, WA 98107

2. Yoroshiku Japanese Restaurant

1913 N 45th St, Seattle, WA 98103
A bowl of miso ramen topped with greens.
The miso ramen at Yoroshiku, an izakaya in Wallingford.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

The shoyu and shio (salt) ramens at this Wallingford izakaya are both solid, but the true star of the menu is the miso ramen, with a depth of earthy flavor lent by the fermented soybean paste. The restaurant also has some of the fattiest pork of all the area’s ramen restaurants — so good it’s worth an upgrade to extra chashu. Yoroshiku also offers unusual options like a wagyu shoyu ramen and a Fisherman ramen featuring local seafood in miso broth.

1913 N 45th St
Seattle, WA 98103

3. Jinya Ramen Bar

15600 NE 8th St, Bellevue, WA 98008
A red bowl of tonkotsu spicy ramen with pork.
Tonkotsu spicy ramen
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Jinya is a Japanese restaurant that found success in Los Angeles before spreading throughout North America. The customer base at the Bellevue branch is less Japanese than Chinese, who often prefer softer noodles, so ask for a shorter cooking time if you want a firmer noodle. The menu dances around a traditional tonkotsu preparation: The tonkotsu red comes closest to traditional (though with non-traditional thick noodles), while the tonkotsu black bursts with garlicky flavor.

15600 NE 8th St
Bellevue, WA 98008

4. Rondo Japanese Kitchen

224 Broadway E, Seattle, WA 98102
A bowl of thick ramen noodles in a dark-brown broth, topped with chunks of oxtail, a hard-boiled egg, and greens.
The Tokyo Shoyu Ramen at Rondo is served with oxtail meat and oxtail broth, lightened by mizuna greens.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

This Capitol Hill izakaya serves up “Tokyo Shoyu Ramen” that’s slightly beefy with oxtail meat and oxtail broth but lightened up with fish powder and mizuna. (Don’t worry; there’s also pork chashu in the bowl.) That same oxtail broth forms the base for black garlic tantan ramen spiked with sesame and sansho (a spice similar to Sichuan peppercorns), plus Chinese pickles. Those that want to go soupless can opt for the shoyu-flavored maze-men.

224 Broadway E
Seattle, WA 98102

5. Ramen Danbo

1222 E Pine St, Seattle, WA 98122
A bowl of tonkotsu ramen with pork, egg, and scallions, and a pair of chopsticks lifting up noodles.
Classic tonkotsu ramen
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Ramen Danbo serves Hakata-style tonkotosu ramen, available in shio, miso, and negi-goma (scallion and toasted sesame) options. Diners can specify noodle thickness and firmness, thickness of broth, amount of lard, and amount of spicy sauce — though even a small amount of spicy sauce can dominate the flavor of the broth. If you’re feeling extra hungry, save some broth and order a portion of additional noodles, known in Japan as “kaedama.”

1222 E Pine St
Seattle, WA 98122

6. Ooink

1416 Harvard Ave, Seattle, WA 98122
Shoyu pork ramen in a white and blue bowl topped with egg.
Shoyu silky pork ramen
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Ooink references chef-owner Chong Boon Ooi’s name and his signature silky pork broth, though he doesn’t call it tonkotsu. This inconspicuous spot serves some of Seattle’s best ramen, rich and wonderful from the variety of house-made tares and noodles. Shoyu is an excellent choice, while the spicy ramen (or spicy kotteri ramen) offers heat levels that get serious as you climb from one to four. Ayam goreng (Malaysian-spiced chicken) serves as a great side dish to a noodle bowl.

1416 Harvard Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

7. Hokkaido Ramen Santouka

103 Bellevue Way NE Ste 3, Bellevue, WA 98004
A white bowl with tonoktsu shio ramen and chopsticks lifting noodles.
Tonkotsu shio ramen
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

After opening several outlets in Japanese supermarkets in the United States and Canada, Santouka debuted its first free-standing American restaurant in Bellevue in 2014 and later expanded to University Village. This Japanese import serves up several varieties of high-quality tonkotsu ramen, with options including shoyu, miso, and spicy miso-flavored tonkotsu. But the simple shio (salt) ramen shows off the pork broth best. It’s also the only one that comes with a pickled red plum. The noodles aren’t the true straight type, but rather slightly wavy, catching more of the broth with each slurp.

103 Bellevue Way NE Ste 3
Bellevue, WA 98004

8. Arashi Ramen

17045 Southcenter Pkwy, Tukwila, WA 98188
A black bowl filled with black ramen, topped with pork and and egg.
Black garlic (salt-based) ramen
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Founded in Tukwila and expanded to Ballard, Arashi focuses on the tonkotsu-style ramen associated with the island of Kyushu in southern Japan. The porky broth is available in shio (salt), shoyu (soy sauce), miso, and spicy miso varieties, and black garlic is a good twist to the tonkotsu miso option. It doesn’t say on the menu, but you can (and should) customize your noodles’ firmness. Ask for firm (katamen) or extra firm (barikata) to avoid the default overcooking to slightly soft.

17045 Southcenter Pkwy
Tukwila, WA 98188

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