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A piece of mackerel nigiri with peach-colored flesh and silver slitted skin, garnished with ginger and green onion.
Mackerel nigiri from Sushi Kappo Tamara.
Jade Yamazaki Stewart/Eater Seattle

14 Destinations for Sensational Sushi in the Seattle Area

Seattle’s sushi masters use top-notch technique to celebrate the region’s bountiful seafood

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Mackerel nigiri from Sushi Kappo Tamara.
| Jade Yamazaki Stewart/Eater Seattle

One of Seattle’s highlights is the abundance of fresh seafood, something that comes in handy for the city’s plentiful sushi restaurants. Shiro Kashiba — who, at 80 years old, still shapes nigiri at Sushi Kashiba at Pike Place Market — introduced Seattle to Edomae-style sushi over fifty years ago. Since then, sushi has become a mainstay of the city's dining scene, with sushi rolls, nigiri, and sashimi now available at sushi bars, izakayas, and kaiseki restaurants across the city. Chefs like Sushi Kappo Tamura’s Taichi Kitamura have since developed close relationships with local fishermen, learning how to source the most sustainable and most delicious ingredients from the nearby ocean. Most recently, Seattle even got its first Peruvian sushi, a creation of Japanese people who settled in Peru in the late 1800s and made dishes using rice, raw fish, and Peruvian ingredients like toasted quinoa and aji amarillo. The following list features some of the most memorable sushi in Seattle. Eater Seattle maintains another list of Japanese restaurants with more diverse menus (which often also include sushi).

As usual, this list is not ranked; it’s organized geographically. Know of a spot that should be on our radar? Send us a tip by emailing seattle@eater.com.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. SanKai

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111 4th Ave N
Edmonds, WA 98020
(425) 412-3417
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Star sushi chef Ryuichi Nakano opened up this Edmonds spot downtown in 2019, and it has quickly gained a loyal following. It’s now offering a wide variety of well-crafted rolls, nigiri, and sashimi for pickup through online preorders, or onsite dining (both indoors and outdoors). Nagano also offers omakase nigiri and sashimi platters. There’s to-go beer, sake, Japanese whiskey, and wine available as well.

2. Toyoda Sushi

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12543 Lake City Way NE
Seattle, WA 98125
(206) 367-7972
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Lake City’s best kept secret is this casual, family-owned sushi restaurant. Besides its reliable menu of specialty rolls and sashimi, Toyoda also serves an incredibly satisfying plate of seared hamachi tuna that shouldn’t be missed. Toyoda offers takeout only Thursday through Sunday from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Orders can be texted to (206) 383-8182 before 1 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. Accepted forms of payment are cash, check, Zelle, and Venmo. The restaurant is hoping to reopen for dine-in next year.

A collection of sashimi, showing yellowtail, roe, and sliced cucumber
Toyoda sushi is a popular Lake City spot.
Toyoda Sushi/Facebook

3. Kisaku Sushi

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2101 N 55th St
Green Lake, WA 98103
(206) 545-9050
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Hidden in Tangletown is one of the best neighborhood restaurants in Seattle. There’s a short list of signature rolls (the Green Lake Roll with salmon, asparagus, and flying fish egg is a highlight), as well as excellent sashimi and nigiri. Kisaku also offers two separate tasting menus which incorporate ingredients from other cuisines — like a raw hamachi dish oranges and Thai chilis. It offers a takeout-only lunch and takeout and dine-in for dinner.

A signature sushi roll at Tangletown, with a green vegetable sprouting out from each piece.
Kisaku is a Tangletown favorite.
Kisaku [Official Photo]

4. Yoroshiku

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1911 N 45th St
Seattle, WA 98103
(206) 547-4649
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While this Wallingford izakaya serves an eclectic menu of ramen, fried chicken, and drinking snacks and isn’t known for its sushi, the raw fish here is some of the best in the city. The sashimi is excellent, particularly the consistently fresh tuna and flavorful coho salmon. And the salty, tangy, shime saba (cured mackerel) on the pressed sushi rolls are supremely satisfying. Keep an eye out for creative sushi specials on the menu too. Yoroshiku’s large dining room consistently packed, so make sure to make a reservation (it’s also one of the few good date-night restaurants in the city open on Mondays.)

5. Sushi Kappo Tamura

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2968 Eastlake Ave E
Seattle, WA 98102
(206) 547-0937
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Renowned chef Taichi Kitamura (a 2018 James Beard Award semifinalist) provides a wide variety of fantastic meal options at his Eastlake destination restaurant. It has a full sushi menu, as well as a nigiri omakase, which includes 12 pieces of seasonal selections and brunch on the weekends. Sushi Kappo Tamura sources its seafood from Pacific Northwest producers like Taylor Shellfish and Skagit River Ranch and has a rooftop garden that provides produce for some of its dishes. Of all the sushi chefs in Seattle, Kitamura may know the most about local fish, providing a sushi experience that couldn’t be replicated in any other part of the country.

6. Nishino

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3130 E Madison St
Seattle, WA 98112
(206) 322-5800
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This lovely, upscale restaurant has been thrilling Madison Park diners since 1995. Small plates, sashimi, and exclusive omakase dinners all get rave reviews and make regulars out of neighbors and destination diners alike. Though the menu is focused on traditional Japanese fare, there are also creative dishes on the menu like “new style sashimi” made with seared shiromi, arugula, and olive oil and toro tartare with white sturgeon caviar.

7. Taneda

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219 Broadway E #14
Seattle, WA 98102
(206) 457-8921
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This nine-seat sushi counter tucked away inside Capitol Hill’s Broadway Alley has an array of offerings besides seafood for its artful multi-course omakase menu, but master chef Hideaki Taneda’s Edomae-style sushi preparations are the main event. Each seasonal dish is lovingly crafted and presented like mini gifts, a one-of-a-kind experience in a city with plenty of competition. Reservations are normally booked out at least a month in advance; your best shot at snagging a seat is regularly checking the restaurant’s website to get a reservation as soon as new spots open up, or adding yourself to the waitlist and hoping someone cancels.

8. I Love Sushi on Lake Bellevue

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23 Lake Bellevue Dr
Bellevue, WA 98005
(425) 455-9090
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I Love Sushi’s Bellevue location’s dining room offers stunning views of Lake Bellevue. It also serves some of the best sushi in the Seattle area, with team trained by Jun Takai, one of Shiro Kashiba’s star apprentices who’s opening his own spot in Bellevue sometime this summer. The lunch menu offers fairly affordable ($20-$30 range) full meals with sushi, miso soup, and green salads, while the dinner menu offers $49.50 kaiseki platters with seasonal fish and various omakase nigiri and sashimi options. Though Edomae-style sushi is the focus here, you can also get your fix of American-style sushi, like spicy tuna and deep-fried crunchy rolls.

9. Shiro's

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2401 2nd Ave
Seattle, WA 98121
(206) 443-9844
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Although titular star chef Shiro Kashiba stepped down from his post here years ago, the venerable Belltown sushi spot remains an excellent sushi destination. Besides the a la carte menu, there’s the option of ordering a takeout “spring platter,” loaded with some of the best spring fish from Tokyo’s Toyosu Market for $150 (orders have to be put in 24 hours in advance) or a dine-in omakase. The restaurant also serves popular crispy rice sushi burgers made with fried rice patties sandwiching ingredients like smoked salmon, tempura shrimp, tofu, and fried chicken with vegetables and sauce.

10. Umi Sake House

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2230 1st Ave
Seattle, WA 98121
(206) 374-8717
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This late-night Belltown destination for sushi, sake, and Japanese whisky offers an impressive list of nigiri and sushi rolls — which include traditional Japanese versions as well as creative American-style specialty rolls like the Dragonfly, made with tempura shrimp, yellowtail, grilled shishito peppers and ghost pepper aioli. Omakase, (starting at $50 per person) is also an option.

11. Sushi Kashiba

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86 Pine St Ste 1
Seattle, WA 98101
(206) 441-8844
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Diners have long flocked to the upscale Pike Place restaurant to watch master sushi chef Shiro Kashiba at work, with seats at the bar among the most coveted. Its meticulous attention to detail remains a big draw, as does chef Kashiba, who is credited for bringing edomae-style sushi to Seattle and has opened some of the city’s best-respected sushi restaurants, including the self-titled Shiro’s Sushi Restaurant in Belltown. First-timers should choose the omakase option and embrace each seasonal offering, although Kashiba’s popular black cod off the a la carte menu is also stellar.

12. Señor Carbón Peruvian Cuisine

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625 1st Ave Ste 100
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 588-0046
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Some of Seattle’s most exciting sushi is served at this new Pioneer Square Peruvian restaurant. Japanese people first settled in Peru in the late 1800s and have since formed a cuisine called Nikkei, which blends Peruvian ingredients and Japanese cooking techniques, resulting in delicious dishes like toro nigiri drizzled with fruity, spicy, aji amarillo sauce and sprinkled with toasted quinoa. Beyond nigiri, the restaurant also serves a variety of sushi rolls employing pairing fish and rice with tangy acevichado sauce, Andean corn sand, and other Peruvian ingredients and flavors.

13. Tsukushinbo

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515 South Main St
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 467-4004
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Located in Japantown’s thriving sushi corridor that features the likes of Maneki and Fuji Sushi is a small family-owned restaurant without a sign. On the other side of a red-framed glass door that simply says “515” is an intimate, small dining area and a plentiful sushi menu. Tsukushinbo typically fills up fast, so it’s ideal to place a reservation beforehand. The restaurant is closing this summer to make way for two new restaurants (one focused on sushi) from the second-generation owners of Tsukushinbo.

14. Mashiko

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4725 California Ave SW
Seattle, WA 98116
(206) 935-4339
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Sustainable sushi is at the core of this West Seattle spot. Although founding chef Hajime Sato stepped away from the restaurant in 2019, he left it in good hands, with a staff that carries on the ethos of carefully sourced fish with an emphasis on traceability and responsible farming practices. The seasonal menu offers a top-notch selection of sushi, sashimi, and nigiri with sometimes unconventional offerings like boar.

1. SanKai

111 4th Ave N, Edmonds, WA 98020

Star sushi chef Ryuichi Nakano opened up this Edmonds spot downtown in 2019, and it has quickly gained a loyal following. It’s now offering a wide variety of well-crafted rolls, nigiri, and sashimi for pickup through online preorders, or onsite dining (both indoors and outdoors). Nagano also offers omakase nigiri and sashimi platters. There’s to-go beer, sake, Japanese whiskey, and wine available as well.

111 4th Ave N
Edmonds, WA 98020

2. Toyoda Sushi

12543 Lake City Way NE, Seattle, WA 98125
A collection of sashimi, showing yellowtail, roe, and sliced cucumber
Toyoda sushi is a popular Lake City spot.
Toyoda Sushi/Facebook

Lake City’s best kept secret is this casual, family-owned sushi restaurant. Besides its reliable menu of specialty rolls and sashimi, Toyoda also serves an incredibly satisfying plate of seared hamachi tuna that shouldn’t be missed. Toyoda offers takeout only Thursday through Sunday from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Orders can be texted to (206) 383-8182 before 1 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. Accepted forms of payment are cash, check, Zelle, and Venmo. The restaurant is hoping to reopen for dine-in next year.

12543 Lake City Way NE
Seattle, WA 98125

3. Kisaku Sushi

2101 N 55th St, Green Lake, WA 98103
A signature sushi roll at Tangletown, with a green vegetable sprouting out from each piece.
Kisaku is a Tangletown favorite.
Kisaku [Official Photo]

Hidden in Tangletown is one of the best neighborhood restaurants in Seattle. There’s a short list of signature rolls (the Green Lake Roll with salmon, asparagus, and flying fish egg is a highlight), as well as excellent sashimi and nigiri. Kisaku also offers two separate tasting menus which incorporate ingredients from other cuisines — like a raw hamachi dish oranges and Thai chilis. It offers a takeout-only lunch and takeout and dine-in for dinner.

2101 N 55th St
Green Lake, WA 98103

4. Yoroshiku

1911 N 45th St, Seattle, WA 98103

While this Wallingford izakaya serves an eclectic menu of ramen, fried chicken, and drinking snacks and isn’t known for its sushi, the raw fish here is some of the best in the city. The sashimi is excellent, particularly the consistently fresh tuna and flavorful coho salmon. And the salty, tangy, shime saba (cured mackerel) on the pressed sushi rolls are supremely satisfying. Keep an eye out for creative sushi specials on the menu too. Yoroshiku’s large dining room consistently packed, so make sure to make a reservation (it’s also one of the few good date-night restaurants in the city open on Mondays.)

1911 N 45th St
Seattle, WA 98103

5. Sushi Kappo Tamura

2968 Eastlake Ave E, Seattle, WA 98102

Renowned chef Taichi Kitamura (a 2018 James Beard Award semifinalist) provides a wide variety of fantastic meal options at his Eastlake destination restaurant. It has a full sushi menu, as well as a nigiri omakase, which includes 12 pieces of seasonal selections and brunch on the weekends. Sushi Kappo Tamura sources its seafood from Pacific Northwest producers like Taylor Shellfish and Skagit River Ranch and has a rooftop garden that provides produce for some of its dishes. Of all the sushi chefs in Seattle, Kitamura may know the most about local fish, providing a sushi experience that couldn’t be replicated in any other part of the country.

2968 Eastlake Ave E
Seattle, WA 98102

6. Nishino

3130 E Madison St, Seattle, WA 98112

This lovely, upscale restaurant has been thrilling Madison Park diners since 1995. Small plates, sashimi, and exclusive omakase dinners all get rave reviews and make regulars out of neighbors and destination diners alike. Though the menu is focused on traditional Japanese fare, there are also creative dishes on the menu like “new style sashimi” made with seared shiromi, arugula, and olive oil and toro tartare with white sturgeon caviar.

3130 E Madison St
Seattle, WA 98112

7. Taneda

219 Broadway E #14, Seattle, WA 98102

This nine-seat sushi counter tucked away inside Capitol Hill’s Broadway Alley has an array of offerings besides seafood for its artful multi-course omakase menu, but master chef Hideaki Taneda’s Edomae-style sushi preparations are the main event. Each seasonal dish is lovingly crafted and presented like mini gifts, a one-of-a-kind experience in a city with plenty of competition. Reservations are normally booked out at least a month in advance; your best shot at snagging a seat is regularly checking the restaurant’s website to get a reservation as soon as new spots open up, or adding yourself to the waitlist and hoping someone cancels.

219 Broadway E #14
Seattle, WA 98102

8. I Love Sushi on Lake Bellevue

23 Lake Bellevue Dr, Bellevue, WA 98005

I Love Sushi’s Bellevue location’s dining room offers stunning views of Lake Bellevue. It also serves some of the best sushi in the Seattle area, with team trained by Jun Takai, one of Shiro Kashiba’s star apprentices who’s opening his own spot in Bellevue sometime this summer. The lunch menu offers fairly affordable ($20-$30 range) full meals with sushi, miso soup, and green salads, while the dinner menu offers $49.50 kaiseki platters with seasonal fish and various omakase nigiri and sashimi options. Though Edomae-style sushi is the focus here, you can also get your fix of American-style sushi, like spicy tuna and deep-fried crunchy rolls.

23 Lake Bellevue Dr
Bellevue, WA 98005

9. Shiro's

2401 2nd Ave, Seattle, WA 98121

Although titular star chef Shiro Kashiba stepped down from his post here years ago, the venerable Belltown sushi spot remains an excellent sushi destination. Besides the a la carte menu, there’s the option of ordering a takeout “spring platter,” loaded with some of the best spring fish from Tokyo’s Toyosu Market for $150 (orders have to be put in 24 hours in advance) or a dine-in omakase. The restaurant also serves popular crispy rice sushi burgers made with fried rice patties sandwiching ingredients like smoked salmon, tempura shrimp, tofu, and fried chicken with vegetables and sauce.

2401 2nd Ave
Seattle, WA 98121

10. Umi Sake House

2230 1st Ave, Seattle, WA 98121

This late-night Belltown destination for sushi, sake, and Japanese whisky offers an impressive list of nigiri and sushi rolls — which include traditional Japanese versions as well as creative American-style specialty rolls like the Dragonfly, made with tempura shrimp, yellowtail, grilled shishito peppers and ghost pepper aioli. Omakase, (starting at $50 per person) is also an option.

2230 1st Ave
Seattle, WA 98121

11. Sushi Kashiba

86 Pine St Ste 1, Seattle, WA 98101

Diners have long flocked to the upscale Pike Place restaurant to watch master sushi chef Shiro Kashiba at work, with seats at the bar among the most coveted. Its meticulous attention to detail remains a big draw, as does chef Kashiba, who is credited for bringing edomae-style sushi to Seattle and has opened some of the city’s best-respected sushi restaurants, including the self-titled Shiro’s Sushi Restaurant in Belltown. First-timers should choose the omakase option and embrace each seasonal offering, although Kashiba’s popular black cod off the a la carte menu is also stellar.

86 Pine St Ste 1
Seattle, WA 98101

12. Señor Carbón Peruvian Cuisine

625 1st Ave Ste 100, Seattle, WA 98104

Some of Seattle’s most exciting sushi is served at this new Pioneer Square Peruvian restaurant. Japanese people first settled in Peru in the late 1800s and have since formed a cuisine called Nikkei, which blends Peruvian ingredients and Japanese cooking techniques, resulting in delicious dishes like toro nigiri drizzled with fruity, spicy, aji amarillo sauce and sprinkled with toasted quinoa. Beyond nigiri, the restaurant also serves a variety of sushi rolls employing pairing fish and rice with tangy acevichado sauce, Andean corn sand, and other Peruvian ingredients and flavors.

625 1st Ave Ste 100
Seattle, WA 98104

13. Tsukushinbo

515 South Main St, Seattle, WA 98104

Located in Japantown’s thriving sushi corridor that features the likes of Maneki and Fuji Sushi is a small family-owned restaurant without a sign. On the other side of a red-framed glass door that simply says “515” is an intimate, small dining area and a plentiful sushi menu. Tsukushinbo typically fills up fast, so it’s ideal to place a reservation beforehand. The restaurant is closing this summer to make way for two new restaurants (one focused on sushi) from the second-generation owners of Tsukushinbo.

515 South Main St
Seattle, WA 98104

14. Mashiko

4725 California Ave SW, Seattle, WA 98116

Sustainable sushi is at the core of this West Seattle spot. Although founding chef Hajime Sato stepped away from the restaurant in 2019, he left it in good hands, with a staff that carries on the ethos of carefully sourced fish with an emphasis on traceability and responsible farming practices. The seasonal menu offers a top-notch selection of sushi, sashimi, and nigiri with sometimes unconventional offerings like boar.

4725 California Ave SW
Seattle, WA 98116

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