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A bowl full of noodles and topped with whole grilled prawns, pieces of grilled beef, shredded carrots, lettuce, and herbs.
A vermicelli noodle bowl decked out with grilled beef, charred prawns, and crispy imperial rolls, from Ba Bar.
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18 Vibrant Vietnamese Restaurants in Seattle

The options in the area go way beyond pho and banh mi

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A vermicelli noodle bowl decked out with grilled beef, charred prawns, and crispy imperial rolls, from Ba Bar.
| Look at Lao Studios

The strong presence of Vietnamese food in Seattle is marked by the ubiquitous pho restaurants all around the city. But there are many types of Vietnamese soup noodles beyond that well-loved bowl, as well as banh mi sandwiches, dry noodle dishes, plates of rice, and, as Anthony Bourdain found years ago, even esoteric preparations of various beasts. Here are 18 Seattle restaurants serving the most excellent and varied dishes of Vietnam.

Know of a spot that should be on our radar? Send us a tip by emailing seattle@eater.com. As usual, this list is not ranked; it’s organized geographically.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Rise and Shine Bakery

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Rise and Shine is Mai Tran’s unassuming bakery with treats like cakes and fresh taro buns. The banh mi features house-made bread and perhaps the most tender grilled pork in the area. Having recently moved from Shoreline to Edmonds, the new location has more tables and enables Tran to serve up several soup options delivered with her signature kind service.

A banh mi sandwich filled with meat, cilantro, and sliced cucumber.
The banh mi at Rise and Shine Bakery in Shoreline.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Lotus Pond Vietnamese Cuisine

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Newly opened in the Haller Lake neighborhood, Lotus Pond is bringing quality Vietnamese food to the north side of Seattle. Bo la lot (charbroiled beef wrapped in betel leaves) are an ideal starter, especially when dipped in the accompanying pineapple-anchovy sauce. The menu includes a wide variety of noodle soups, including Hai Phong crab red noodle soup with wide red rice noodles, and the woven vermicelli plates come with intricate bundles of thin noodles along with an array of protein options like lemongrass beef and shrimp cakes.

Monsoon

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For Seattle’s (and Bellevue’s) original upscale Vietnamese experience, diners need look no further than Eric and Sophie Banh’s Monsoon, a sibling restaurant to Ba Bar. Using finer ingredients sourced locally when possible, Monsoon blends traditional Vietnamese cuisine with Pacific Northwest innovation for food with a fine-dining flair. Drunken chicken, catfish clay pot, and banana cake for dessert are among the popular dishes. There are sometimes special feasting opportunities to enjoy Dungeness crab too.

A clay pot filled with chunks of catfish, sliced jalapeño, a red chili pepper, and chopped green onion.
The catfish claypot at Monsoon.
Look at Lao studios

Ba Sa Restaurant

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Vietnamese siblings Trinh and Thai Nguyen— who came to the U.S. as refugees — explore the food of their childhood at this modern Bainbridge Island restaurant. Southeast Asian flavors meet locally farmed and foraged ingredients in dishes like its pho, served with dry-aged ribeye or mushrooms, while small plates like the shrimp and pork wontons swimming in pools of chili and truffle oil and the chili-lime-butter calamari offer moments of decadence. The wood-floored dining room is decorated with a 10-foot-wide painting of a catfish that oversees diners who take ferries from all over the Seattle area for the Nguyens’ cooking.

With multiple locations throughout the city, Ba Bar is the place to fork over a few extra dollars for the finest bowl of pho in town. But the menu goes well beyond beef noodle soup. Bun bowls with vermicelli noodles are popular, as are slow-roasted rotisserie meats such as chicken, duck, and pork belly. Housemade pastries include macarons (available daily) and pandan cake (available Saturday, Sunday, and Monday) — perfect with a cup of strong, sweet, Vietnamese coffee.

A bowl full of noodles and topped with whole grilled prawns, pieces of grilled beef, shredded carrots, lettuce, and herbs.
A vermicelli noodle bowl decked out with grilled beef, charred prawns, and crispy imperial rolls, from Ba Bar.
Look at Lao Studios

Dong Thap Noodles

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Named for a Vietnamese province known for rice production, Dong Thap turns rice into fresh noodles that form the foundation of the menu, including soup noodles and dry bun bowls of vermicelli topped with meat, vegetables, and egg rolls. Diners can order pho with a choice of two noodles — one is a wide, flat version that is traditional in pho but hard to find locally. The noodles are soft and slippery, yet slightly chewy, and are also available to buy at the counter to cook at home.

A bowl of pho topped with rare beef slices and a generous amount of sliced green onion.
A bowl of beef pho at Dong Thap Noodles.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Saigon Vietnam Deli

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The barbecue pork banh mi at Saigon Vietnam Deli is a treat, but don’t overlook the “lunch box” of two or three entrees and a pile of rice for just a few bucks more. Beef stew, stuffed bitter melon, and coconut chicken are among the top picks. As with other nearby delis, diners can also buy fresh spring rolls, banh cuon (rice crepes), and other Vietnamese bites, including neon-colored sweets.

A deli spread with fried items, steamed buns, stir fries,, soups, and more.
The deli spread at Saigon Vietnam Deli.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Vietnam House

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Vietnam House shares the same parking lot as Tamarind Tree, though it attracts more of a Vietnamese clientele. This is a reliable spot for broken rice dishes, including one with a grilled pork chop, shrimp on sugar cane, deep-fried bean curd, and a fried egg. With more than 100 items, the menu may be a bit overwhelming. Note, though, that nearly every table orders bun mang vit (duck and bamboo vermicelli noodle soup). It’s available one hour after opening, and typically sells out before the end of the day.

A plate of broken rice topped with grilled meat, a fried egg, lettuce, and shredded carrot.
A broken rice meat plate at Vietnam House.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Pho Bac Sup Shop

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Pho Bac Sup Shop shares a Little Saigon parking lot with currently closed sibling restaurant Pho Bac (they’re both owned by the same family, with the Pho Bac building shaped like a boat), but there’s a lot more on the menu than soup noodles. The pho tron (“dry pho”) is outstanding, and there are tasty bites like pho fries and twice-fried chicken wings with tamarind fish sauce glaze on the menu as well.

A bowl of rice noodles topped with bean sprouts, sliced beef, and herbs, with a cup of broth on the side.
The dry pho at Pho Bac Sup Shop.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Pho So 1

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In a city full of pho, Pho So 1 puts the word right in its name and succeeds in making the beef noodle soup shine. No. 20 on the menu offers the widest variety of meat: rare beef, well-done flank, fatty flank, tendon, and tripe. If you can break free of the comforting pho grasp, the bun bo hue is also worth a try for its spicier, funkier broth.

A bowl of pho with thin rice noodles, a variety of meat, and sliced onions and scallions.
The pho at Pho So 1.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Hue Ky Mi Gia

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At this 12th and Jackson strip mall gem, customers at Hue Ky Mi Gia gravitate toward the fried butter chicken wings. Crusted with garlic, green onion, chili, and salt, they’re delicious to eat alone, or dipped in the tangy, sweet chili sauce served on the side. The wings are the perfect appetizer ahead of one of the many noodle dishes on the menu, which includes egg or rice noodle soups (braised duck is especially popular), chow mein and chow fun, and stir-fried vermicelli plates.

A plate of fried butter chicken wings at Hue Ky Mi Gia.
The chicken wings at Hue Ky Mi Gia.
Jenise Silva/Eater Seattle

Huong Binh Vietnamese Cuisine

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Another standout at 12th and Jackson hits the mark with its intersection of quality and value. The grilled pork, perfectly caramelized, is a specialty, particularly as part of banh hoi thit nuong, where pork skewers accompany intricate bundles of thin rice noodles garnished with ground shrimp and scallion. The intriguing menu expands on weekends, when specials include duck noodle soup as well as congee served with blood sausage, pork tongue, liver, and ear.

A platter with vermicelli noodles, cucumber matchsticks, shredded lettuce, grilled meat, and pickled sliced radish and carrots.
The bun cha at Huong Binh.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Thanh Son Tofu

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This is the place to go for some of the best tofu in town. Here you’ll find large blocks of firm tofu, containers of plain or sweet soy milk, and tofu pudding with ginger syrup. There’s also a tofu bar with various flavors of fried tofu, including lemongrass-chili. And for those who can’t wait to eat, you can order a variety of banh mi sandwiches — including, of course, tofu.

Billiard Hoang

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This Columbia City pool hall with a sports bar feel is a popular hangout for some in the Vietnamese community, and the quality of its kitchen justifies a visit — either for takeout or for a fun dine-in experience. Noteworthy items include banh mi, bun (dry noodle bowls), and soups like bun bo hue, bun rieu (crabmeat with tofu and rice noodles), and bo kho (beef stew with noodles or bread). Bun mang vit (duck noodle soup with bamboo shoots) is especially popular here.

A bowl of pho with a banh mi and some sliced meat on a plate in the background on a wooden table.
The pho and banh mi at Billiard Hoang in South Seattle
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Tony's Bakery

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One of many good Vietnamese restaurants near Othello Station, Tony’s Bakery offers Vietnamese deli items, entree-and-rice boxes, and more. It even bakes its own bread for banh mi. While the dac biet (house special) banh mi is popular, insiders order banh mi ca xa ot, with battered and fried basa fish (a type of catfish) and a smear of garlic-chive aioli. (Across the parking lot, Q Bakery also prepares delicious banh mi; its homemade bread is more crackly with a denser crumb.)

A banh mi sandwich filled with fried fish, sliced jalapeños, sliced onion, shredded carrots, and cilantro.
The fried basa fish banh mi at Tony’s Bakery.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Rainier BBQ and Restaurant

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Ever since Anthony Bourdain made a stop here for an episode of “The Layover,” Rainier BBQ has been a popular destination for Vietnamese food on the south side of Seattle. Recommendations include hu tieu nam vang (glass noodle soup packed with proteins and herbs) shaking cube beef, and ong choy beef salad with its curly wisps of water spinach. The Rainier catfish is the head-turner for newcomers, as the deep-fried fish averages close to eight pounds each and overhang the platters as they come out of the kitchen with a sizzle.

A bowl of large clams in a dark sauce with a plate of stir-fried greens in the background
The BBQ clams and ong choi at Rainier BBQ and Restaurant.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Hoang Lan

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At the south end of the Vietnamese “strip” along MLK, at the Othello Station light-rail stop, this humble hole-in-the-wall has a small number of tables waiting, a television typically blaring, and an owner likely whistling or singing. The sign outside says Bun Bo Hue, which is easily mistaken as the name of the restaurant — rather, it’s the signature dish and the one to order, with its gelatinous pork knuckle and earthy pork blood cakes.

Dalat Quan

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This White Center restaurant features Da Lat-style special noodle soups, including various versions of nam vang noodle soup and a Da Lat version of bun bo hue that contains beef brisket. The best might be the mi quang, a hearty bowl with turmeric noodles, pork spare ribs, prawns, quail eggs, and a sesame rice cracker. The banh xeo is an interactive experience: Diners put pieces of the Vietnamese pancake, herbs, and greens (including, in season, a mustard leaf called cai be xanh) inside rice paper to eat more neatly.

A bowl of of noodle soup with thick rice noodles, a cracker, and a plate with lime slices and herbs next to it.
A bowl of mi quang, with turmeric noodles, pork spare ribs, prawns, and quail eggs.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Rise and Shine Bakery

A banh mi sandwich filled with meat, cilantro, and sliced cucumber.
The banh mi at Rise and Shine Bakery in Shoreline.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Rise and Shine is Mai Tran’s unassuming bakery with treats like cakes and fresh taro buns. The banh mi features house-made bread and perhaps the most tender grilled pork in the area. Having recently moved from Shoreline to Edmonds, the new location has more tables and enables Tran to serve up several soup options delivered with her signature kind service.

A banh mi sandwich filled with meat, cilantro, and sliced cucumber.
The banh mi at Rise and Shine Bakery in Shoreline.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Lotus Pond Vietnamese Cuisine

Newly opened in the Haller Lake neighborhood, Lotus Pond is bringing quality Vietnamese food to the north side of Seattle. Bo la lot (charbroiled beef wrapped in betel leaves) are an ideal starter, especially when dipped in the accompanying pineapple-anchovy sauce. The menu includes a wide variety of noodle soups, including Hai Phong crab red noodle soup with wide red rice noodles, and the woven vermicelli plates come with intricate bundles of thin noodles along with an array of protein options like lemongrass beef and shrimp cakes.

Monsoon

A clay pot filled with chunks of catfish, sliced jalapeño, a red chili pepper, and chopped green onion.
The catfish claypot at Monsoon.
Look at Lao studios

For Seattle’s (and Bellevue’s) original upscale Vietnamese experience, diners need look no further than Eric and Sophie Banh’s Monsoon, a sibling restaurant to Ba Bar. Using finer ingredients sourced locally when possible, Monsoon blends traditional Vietnamese cuisine with Pacific Northwest innovation for food with a fine-dining flair. Drunken chicken, catfish clay pot, and banana cake for dessert are among the popular dishes. There are sometimes special feasting opportunities to enjoy Dungeness crab too.

A clay pot filled with chunks of catfish, sliced jalapeño, a red chili pepper, and chopped green onion.
The catfish claypot at Monsoon.
Look at Lao studios

Ba Sa Restaurant

Vietnamese siblings Trinh and Thai Nguyen— who came to the U.S. as refugees — explore the food of their childhood at this modern Bainbridge Island restaurant. Southeast Asian flavors meet locally farmed and foraged ingredients in dishes like its pho, served with dry-aged ribeye or mushrooms, while small plates like the shrimp and pork wontons swimming in pools of chili and truffle oil and the chili-lime-butter calamari offer moments of decadence. The wood-floored dining room is decorated with a 10-foot-wide painting of a catfish that oversees diners who take ferries from all over the Seattle area for the Nguyens’ cooking.

Ba Bar

A bowl full of noodles and topped with whole grilled prawns, pieces of grilled beef, shredded carrots, lettuce, and herbs.
A vermicelli noodle bowl decked out with grilled beef, charred prawns, and crispy imperial rolls, from Ba Bar.
Look at Lao Studios

With multiple locations throughout the city, Ba Bar is the place to fork over a few extra dollars for the finest bowl of pho in town. But the menu goes well beyond beef noodle soup. Bun bowls with vermicelli noodles are popular, as are slow-roasted rotisserie meats such as chicken, duck, and pork belly. Housemade pastries include macarons (available daily) and pandan cake (available Saturday, Sunday, and Monday) — perfect with a cup of strong, sweet, Vietnamese coffee.

A bowl full of noodles and topped with whole grilled prawns, pieces of grilled beef, shredded carrots, lettuce, and herbs.
A vermicelli noodle bowl decked out with grilled beef, charred prawns, and crispy imperial rolls, from Ba Bar.
Look at Lao Studios

Dong Thap Noodles

A bowl of pho topped with rare beef slices and a generous amount of sliced green onion.
A bowl of beef pho at Dong Thap Noodles.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Named for a Vietnamese province known for rice production, Dong Thap turns rice into fresh noodles that form the foundation of the menu, including soup noodles and dry bun bowls of vermicelli topped with meat, vegetables, and egg rolls. Diners can order pho with a choice of two noodles — one is a wide, flat version that is traditional in pho but hard to find locally. The noodles are soft and slippery, yet slightly chewy, and are also available to buy at the counter to cook at home.

A bowl of pho topped with rare beef slices and a generous amount of sliced green onion.
A bowl of beef pho at Dong Thap Noodles.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Saigon Vietnam Deli

A deli spread with fried items, steamed buns, stir fries,, soups, and more.
The deli spread at Saigon Vietnam Deli.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

The barbecue pork banh mi at Saigon Vietnam Deli is a treat, but don’t overlook the “lunch box” of two or three entrees and a pile of rice for just a few bucks more. Beef stew, stuffed bitter melon, and coconut chicken are among the top picks. As with other nearby delis, diners can also buy fresh spring rolls, banh cuon (rice crepes), and other Vietnamese bites, including neon-colored sweets.

A deli spread with fried items, steamed buns, stir fries,, soups, and more.
The deli spread at Saigon Vietnam Deli.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Vietnam House

A plate of broken rice topped with grilled meat, a fried egg, lettuce, and shredded carrot.
A broken rice meat plate at Vietnam House.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Vietnam House shares the same parking lot as Tamarind Tree, though it attracts more of a Vietnamese clientele. This is a reliable spot for broken rice dishes, including one with a grilled pork chop, shrimp on sugar cane, deep-fried bean curd, and a fried egg. With more than 100 items, the menu may be a bit overwhelming. Note, though, that nearly every table orders bun mang vit (duck and bamboo vermicelli noodle soup). It’s available one hour after opening, and typically sells out before the end of the day.

A plate of broken rice topped with grilled meat, a fried egg, lettuce, and shredded carrot.
A broken rice meat plate at Vietnam House.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Pho Bac Sup Shop

A bowl of rice noodles topped with bean sprouts, sliced beef, and herbs, with a cup of broth on the side.
The dry pho at Pho Bac Sup Shop.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Pho Bac Sup Shop shares a Little Saigon parking lot with currently closed sibling restaurant Pho Bac (they’re both owned by the same family, with the Pho Bac building shaped like a boat), but there’s a lot more on the menu than soup noodles. The pho tron (“dry pho”) is outstanding, and there are tasty bites like pho fries and twice-fried chicken wings with tamarind fish sauce glaze on the menu as well.

A bowl of rice noodles topped with bean sprouts, sliced beef, and herbs, with a cup of broth on the side.
The dry pho at Pho Bac Sup Shop.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Pho So 1

A bowl of pho with thin rice noodles, a variety of meat, and sliced onions and scallions.
The pho at Pho So 1.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

In a city full of pho, Pho So 1 puts the word right in its name and succeeds in making the beef noodle soup shine. No. 20 on the menu offers the widest variety of meat: rare beef, well-done flank, fatty flank, tendon, and tripe. If you can break free of the comforting pho grasp, the bun bo hue is also worth a try for its spicier, funkier broth.

A bowl of pho with thin rice noodles, a variety of meat, and sliced onions and scallions.
The pho at Pho So 1.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Hue Ky Mi Gia

A plate of fried butter chicken wings at Hue Ky Mi Gia.
The chicken wings at Hue Ky Mi Gia.
Jenise Silva/Eater Seattle

At this 12th and Jackson strip mall gem, customers at Hue Ky Mi Gia gravitate toward the fried butter chicken wings. Crusted with garlic, green onion, chili, and salt, they’re delicious to eat alone, or dipped in the tangy, sweet chili sauce served on the side. The wings are the perfect appetizer ahead of one of the many noodle dishes on the menu, which includes egg or rice noodle soups (braised duck is especially popular), chow mein and chow fun, and stir-fried vermicelli plates.

A plate of fried butter chicken wings at Hue Ky Mi Gia.
The chicken wings at Hue Ky Mi Gia.
Jenise Silva/Eater Seattle

Huong Binh Vietnamese Cuisine

A platter with vermicelli noodles, cucumber matchsticks, shredded lettuce, grilled meat, and pickled sliced radish and carrots.
The bun cha at Huong Binh.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Another standout at 12th and Jackson hits the mark with its intersection of quality and value. The grilled pork, perfectly caramelized, is a specialty, particularly as part of banh hoi thit nuong, where pork skewers accompany intricate bundles of thin rice noodles garnished with ground shrimp and scallion. The intriguing menu expands on weekends, when specials include duck noodle soup as well as congee served with blood sausage, pork tongue, liver, and ear.

A platter with vermicelli noodles, cucumber matchsticks, shredded lettuce, grilled meat, and pickled sliced radish and carrots.
The bun cha at Huong Binh.
Jay Friedman/Eater Seattle

Thanh Son Tofu

This is the place to go for some of the best tofu in town. Here you’ll find large blocks of firm tofu, containers of plain or sweet soy milk, and tofu pudding with ginger syrup. There’s also a tofu bar with various flavors of fried tofu, including lemongrass-chili. And for those who can’t wait to eat, you can order a variety of banh mi sandwiches — including, of course, tofu.