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A sunset over the red “Public Market” sign at Pike Place Market.
Pike Place Market is a magnet for tourists, but the dining options delight all visitors.
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14 Great Restaurants Near Pike Place Market

Including expert omakase, pillowy quiche, knockout dumplings, and more

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Pike Place Market is a magnet for tourists, but the dining options delight all visitors.
| Getty Images

A joy for tourists and locals alike, Pike Place Market is a vibrant collection of stalls and permanent establishments offering crafts, flowers, artwork, vegetables, fruits, meat, and yes, the famous fish throwing guys.

The market, which has been open since 1907, is often crowded and sometimes overwhelming, but among maze of stalls and throngs of tourists are some treasures: fresh-caught salmon blackened on the grill in front of you, salmon collar sinigang at a venerable Filipina lunch counter, and the best collection of French restaurants in Seattle. Here are some favorites, including snacks to grab and eat while perusing the market’s offerings as well as restaurants perfect for sit-down meals after long days of shopping.

A tip for tourists: Pike Place gets extremely crowded and hard to navigate on weekends, especially during the summer, so visit on a weekday if at all possible. And remember, it’s “Pike Place,” not “Pike’s Place.”

Know of a spot that should be on our radar? Send us a tip by emailing seattle@eater.com. As usual, this list is not ranked; it’s organized geographically.

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Le Pichet

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This French bistro and cafe a couple of blocks from the center of Pike Place is a good spot for a breather. Lunch offerings, including baguette sandwiches like ham and gruyere, are simple and delicious, as are the pillowy quiches. The restaurant also serves entrees like duck leg confit, steak frites, and whole roasted chicken for dinner.

Ludi's Restaurant

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Juuuuust far away enough from the market that it doesn’t get swarmed by tourists is the third (or fourth, who’s counting?) incarnation of Ludi’s, the classic Filipino-American diner. If you’ve got visitors in town and want to wow ‘em on a weekend, the ube pancakes are endlessly grammable, and also surprisingly light, but the regulars here are more likely to get silog (garlic rice, eggs, and a meat). Don’t forget to visit the condiment table, which is STACKED, before you eat.

A plate of pancakes covered in bright purple sauce garnished with whipped cream.
Ube pancakes at Ludi’s
Suzi Pratt

The Pink Door

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One of Seattle’s enduring Italian restaurants, located in Post Alley, offers plenty of well-crafted pasta selections, including linguini with baby clams and pancetta in a white wine sauce and a popular spinach lasagna. Diners who plan ahead should try to score a spot on the outdoor deck, which fills up quickly on sunny days.

Seattle Dumpling Co.

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You know a place is going to be great when it has a huge range of sriracha sauces and vinegars on the counter, and this cranny-sized dumpling destination doesn’t disappoint. It’s a great reprieve on cold days, when you can grab shu mai or bao for under $10 and warm yourself from the inside out. As a bonus it’s a little off the beaten track and therefore less crowded than similar grab-and-go places like Piroshky Piroshky.

Hellenika Cultured Creamery

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This space was a butcher shop before Alex Apostolopoulos, one of the founders of market stand–turned–megabrand Ellenos Yogurt, gutted it and turned it into a sleek new yogurt shop decked out in white and blue tiles. Apostolopoulos and his team (including his brother Greg) have a new product — it’s creamier than gelato, smoother and less sweet than ice cream, cultured like yogurt but definitely not yogurt. Just taste it for yourself. The flavors, like London Fog and Honey Lavender, often draw on ingredients from the market.

Sushi Kashiba

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This is like the “first”. Starbucks for omakase heads — sort of a tourist destination, sort of a shrine. It’s run by Shiro Kashiba, a.k.a. Shiro-san, the most influential sushi chef in Seattle history. Now in his 80s, Shiro-san is still behind the sushi counter Mondays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays; on those days the line for counter seats, which are walk-in-only, is extremely competitive. But even if you’re dining with one of Kashiba’s many apprentice chefs, the sushi here is top-notch, though it’s also one of the more expensive restaurants around the market. (There’s an a la carte menu available as well.)

Cafe Campagne

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This longtime Pike Place wonder from chef Daisley Gordon is well-regarded for its dedication to classic Parisian fare, served in a warmly lit dining room. Start dinner with escargot or calamari, order the roasted chicken with natural jus for an entree and finish with a delightful chocolate cognac mousse. Lunch and weekend brunch menus offer house-made croissants and a popular quiche with Comtè cheese, which can be taken to-go or enjoyed in the dining room

Market Grill

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It’s easy to miss this little counter, but Market Grill has some of the best seafood in the market, which makes it some of the best seafood in the whole city. Their star item is a blackened-just-right piece of wild-caught salmon between two slices of warm grilled bread. At $20 for a sandwich it isn’t a bargain, but it is a necessity. They also have chowder, seafood stew, and poke.  

Lowell's Restaurant

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According to Seattle’s paper of record, “counter-serve” restaurants are the hot new trend, but Lowell’s has been doing the whole, “line up to order at the register, then hunt for a table” thing since the ‘50s and it’s working. During peak hours you probably won’t be able to score a windowside table, but you can still get classics like fish and chips or Lowell’s allegedly famous Dungeness crab omelette. The top and bottom floors are kid-friendly and the middle floor is a bar with a robust bloody mary menu.

Oriental Mart

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Steps away from all the foot traffic, this part-market, part-deli quietly cooks some of the finest Filipino cuisine in the city. After years going without a menu, the family-owned lunch counter got a little more structure, though you still order at the grocery store cash register. Not changing is the famed salmon collar sinigang from chef Leila Rosas, which helped earn this spot a James Beard Classics Award.

Pasta Casalinga

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This Pike Place star has a rotating menu of simple, yet thoughtful, made-to-order pasta plates that all cost less than $20. Dishes typically include a bowl of handmade pasta tossed with a light sauce and locally caught or foraged ingredients, such as creste di gallo pasta morels, pancetta, ricotta, and safron or classic pomodoro. You can eat at a small counter in the restaurant or take the food to go.

Jarrbar

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This tapas bar off Western Avenue rivals any other in the city. The candlelit tables and soulful grooves playing over the speakers make it an excellent spot to sip its inventive cocktails and snack on small bites like boquerones, cheeses, and cured meats. There’s also some outside seats that make for great people watching.

Post Alley Pizza

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This pizza counter tucked away down an alley from the market underwent an ownership change a few years ago when a group including Yasuaki Saito (of Saint Bread) bought it. This new management upgraded the ingredients, revamped the dough, and now its slices (with specials that change daily) are among the best in the city. The crust, made by chef Andrew Gregory, is a marvel: sturdy enough to hold toppings, slightly crispy, wonderfully chewy.

This Georgian cafe a few blocks south of the market specializes in kachapuri, cheesy bread boats popular in Eastern Europe. The classic “adjaruli” version is simply served with a runny egg yolk and butter. The “lobiani” version — filled with beans, bacon, red chili, cheese, and egg is another good bet. Note: These kachapuri are defined by dairy, and no vegan versions are served.

Le Pichet

This French bistro and cafe a couple of blocks from the center of Pike Place is a good spot for a breather. Lunch offerings, including baguette sandwiches like ham and gruyere, are simple and delicious, as are the pillowy quiches. The restaurant also serves entrees like duck leg confit, steak frites, and whole roasted chicken for dinner.

Ludi's Restaurant

Juuuuust far away enough from the market that it doesn’t get swarmed by tourists is the third (or fourth, who’s counting?) incarnation of Ludi’s, the classic Filipino-American diner. If you’ve got visitors in town and want to wow ‘em on a weekend, the ube pancakes are endlessly grammable, and also surprisingly light, but the regulars here are more likely to get silog (garlic rice, eggs, and a meat). Don’t forget to visit the condiment table, which is STACKED, before you eat.

A plate of pancakes covered in bright purple sauce garnished with whipped cream.
Ube pancakes at Ludi’s
Suzi Pratt

The Pink Door

One of Seattle’s enduring Italian restaurants, located in Post Alley, offers plenty of well-crafted pasta selections, including linguini with baby clams and pancetta in a white wine sauce and a popular spinach lasagna. Diners who plan ahead should try to score a spot on the outdoor deck, which fills up quickly on sunny days.

Seattle Dumpling Co.

You know a place is going to be great when it has a huge range of sriracha sauces and vinegars on the counter, and this cranny-sized dumpling destination doesn’t disappoint. It’s a great reprieve on cold days, when you can grab shu mai or bao for under $10 and warm yourself from the inside out. As a bonus it’s a little off the beaten track and therefore less crowded than similar grab-and-go places like Piroshky Piroshky.

Hellenika Cultured Creamery

This space was a butcher shop before Alex Apostolopoulos, one of the founders of market stand–turned–megabrand Ellenos Yogurt, gutted it and turned it into a sleek new yogurt shop decked out in white and blue tiles. Apostolopoulos and his team (including his brother Greg) have a new product — it’s creamier than gelato, smoother and less sweet than ice cream, cultured like yogurt but definitely not yogurt. Just taste it for yourself. The flavors, like London Fog and Honey Lavender, often draw on ingredients from the market.

Sushi Kashiba

This is like the “first”. Starbucks for omakase heads — sort of a tourist destination, sort of a shrine. It’s run by Shiro Kashiba, a.k.a. Shiro-san, the most influential sushi chef in Seattle history. Now in his 80s, Shiro-san is still behind the sushi counter Mondays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays; on those days the line for counter seats, which are walk-in-only, is extremely competitive. But even if you’re dining with one of Kashiba’s many apprentice chefs, the sushi here is top-notch, though it’s also one of the more expensive restaurants around the market. (There’s an a la carte menu available as well.)

Cafe Campagne

This longtime Pike Place wonder from chef Daisley Gordon is well-regarded for its dedication to classic Parisian fare, served in a warmly lit dining room. Start dinner with escargot or calamari, order the roasted chicken with natural jus for an entree and finish with a delightful chocolate cognac mousse. Lunch and weekend brunch menus offer house-made croissants and a popular quiche with Comtè cheese, which can be taken to-go or enjoyed in the dining room

Market Grill

It’s easy to miss this little counter, but Market Grill has some of the best seafood in the market, which makes it some of the best seafood in the whole city. Their star item is a blackened-just-right piece of wild-caught salmon between two slices of warm grilled bread. At $20 for a sandwich it isn’t a bargain, but it is a necessity. They also have chowder, seafood stew, and poke.  

Lowell's Restaurant

According to Seattle’s paper of record, “counter-serve” restaurants are the hot new trend, but Lowell’s has been doing the whole, “line up to order at the register, then hunt for a table” thing since the ‘50s and it’s working. During peak hours you probably won’t be able to score a windowside table, but you can still get classics like fish and chips or Lowell’s allegedly famous Dungeness crab omelette. The top and bottom floors are kid-friendly and the middle floor is a bar with a robust bloody mary menu.

Oriental Mart

Steps away from all the foot traffic, this part-market, part-deli quietly cooks some of the finest Filipino cuisine in the city. After years going without a menu, the family-owned lunch counter got a little more structure, though you still order at the grocery store cash register. Not changing is the famed salmon collar sinigang from chef Leila Rosas, which helped earn this spot a James Beard Classics Award.

Pasta Casalinga

This Pike Place star has a rotating menu of simple, yet thoughtful, made-to-order pasta plates that all cost less than $20. Dishes typically include a bowl of handmade pasta tossed with a light sauce and locally caught or foraged ingredients, such as creste di gallo pasta morels, pancetta, ricotta, and safron or classic pomodoro. You can eat at a small counter in the restaurant or take the food to go.

Jarrbar

This tapas bar off Western Avenue rivals any other in the city. The candlelit tables and soulful grooves playing over the speakers make it an excellent spot to sip its inventive cocktails and snack on small bites like boquerones, cheeses, and cured meats. There’s also some outside seats that make for great people watching.

Post Alley Pizza

This pizza counter tucked away down an alley from the market underwent an ownership change a few years ago when a group including Yasuaki Saito (of Saint Bread) bought it. This new management upgraded the ingredients, revamped the dough, and now its slices (with specials that change daily) are among the best in the city. The crust, made by chef Andrew Gregory, is a marvel: sturdy enough to hold toppings, slightly crispy, wonderfully chewy.

Skalka

This Georgian cafe a few blocks south of the market specializes in kachapuri, cheesy bread boats popular in Eastern Europe. The classic “adjaruli” version is simply served with a runny egg yolk and butter. The “lobiani” version — filled with beans, bacon, red chili, cheese, and egg is another good bet. Note: These kachapuri are defined by dairy, and no vegan versions are served.

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