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A plate filled with fermented vegetables at Musang in Beacon Hill.
Fermented vegetables at Musang.
Suzi Pratt

Every Seattle Restaurant Marcus Samuelsson Visits on ‘No Passport Required’

Where to find chicken adobo, ube cheesecake, longganisa, and more

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Fermented vegetables at Musang.
| Suzi Pratt

“When you taste Filipino food, you taste the history,” Marcus Samuelsson says in the “Seattle” episode of No Passport Required. Chinese trade influences, 500 years of Spanish colonial rule, and Pacific Northwestern flavors all interplay with Filipino techniques and ingredients — including vinegar, which plays an important role in many dishes — to create a cuisine. In this episode, Samuelsson talks to Filipino-American chefs, business owners, and historians to understand more about the community in the Seattle region; keep reading to see which restaurants he visits (listed geographically, from north to south).

Watch the full episode here, and find all episodes from Season 1 and Season 2 on PBS.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Barkada

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Samuelsson doesn’t visit Brian Madayag’s restaurant Barkada in Edmonds, Washington, but he does go squid jigging with the chef of the Filipino-Hawaiian spot. Barkada has an all-day menu and cocktails with tropical and Filipino influences.

Chef Marcus Samuelsson, chef Brian Madayag, friends, and family go squid jigging on Edmonds Pier outside of Seattle.
Fishing for squid with tchef Brian Madayag of Barkada.
Suzi Pratt

Hood Famous Bakeshop

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Hood Famous co-owners Chera Amlag and Geo Quibuyen serve savory and sweet pastries, such as the classic and coconutty buko pie and the visually enticing ube cheesecake, made with purple yams, at their standout bakery. There are also savory baked goods and a coffee menu that includes lattes with ingredients like pandan and calamansi.

A tray of small cheescakes flavored with mango and calamansi.
Mango calamansi cheesecakes.
Esra Erol

Knee High Stocking Co

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Knee High Stocking Co is a Filipino-owned speakeasy serving Prohibition-era cocktails and house-made shrubs, plus a menu of Filipino-inspired American food. Over drinks, Samuelsson shares a meal featuring dishes like pork adobo and arroz caldo.

Knee High Stocking Co’s low-lit entrance near Denny Triangle.
The low-key entrance at Knee High Stocking Co.
Suzi Pratt

Oriental Mart

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Chef and co-owner Leila Rosas runs Oriental Mart in Pike Place Market; the shop opened selling groceries in 1971 and added prepared foods later on. A true boss, Rosas has a simple setup, but her flavors are bold and complex. Be sure to try the salmon sinigang, the longganisa, and the chicken adobo.

The counter at Oriental Mart at Pike Place, with various hand-drawn signs displayed.
Oriental Mart has become a Pike Place icon.
Esra Erol

Chef Melissa Miranda’s longtime pop-up, Musang, now has a permanent home. The restaurant opened in early January; read more on Eater Seattle and catch Miranda talking about her restaurant and showing Samuelsson around the city on this episode of No Passport Required.

The lavender-painted exterior of Musang with the restaurant’s sign along the fence.
Musang took over the former Travelers Thali House in Beacon Hill.
Suzi Pratt

Fou Lee Market

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Fou Lee in Beacon Hill is the go-to market for people who want to stock their ingredients with Filipino ingredients. Find fermented fish sauce, shrimp, packaged goods, and prepared dishes including ube pastries and dinuguan, a pork blood stew.

The sign outside Fou Lee Market & Deli with the grocery’s name in bold red letters.
Fou Lee Market is a staple for Filipino groceries.
Suzi Pratt

Archipelago

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All the ingredients at Hillman City’s tasting-menu spot Archipelago are sourced from the Pacific Northwest. As chef and co-owner Aaron Verzosa says, the ethos behind the restaurant comes from answering the question, “Can I find the taste of what I grew up with in ingredients that are not used in Filipino cuisine?” He and co-owner Amber Manuguid categorize Archipelago as “Pacific Northwest progressive Filipino American cuisine.”

Samuelsson tries a pandesal made with Washington wheat and served with shallot butter and caviar from Idaho; kinilaw, a ceviche made with steelhead and served in a presentation that honors local cannery workers; and Oregon king salmon sinigang, among other dishes.

The exterior of Archipelago with the restaurant’s name on the green-trimmed door.
Archipelago specializes in Filipino fine dining.
Suzi Pratt

Barkada

Chef Marcus Samuelsson, chef Brian Madayag, friends, and family go squid jigging on Edmonds Pier outside of Seattle.
Fishing for squid with tchef Brian Madayag of Barkada.
Suzi Pratt

Samuelsson doesn’t visit Brian Madayag’s restaurant Barkada in Edmonds, Washington, but he does go squid jigging with the chef of the Filipino-Hawaiian spot. Barkada has an all-day menu and cocktails with tropical and Filipino influences.

Chef Marcus Samuelsson, chef Brian Madayag, friends, and family go squid jigging on Edmonds Pier outside of Seattle.
Fishing for squid with tchef Brian Madayag of Barkada.
Suzi Pratt

Hood Famous Bakeshop

A tray of small cheescakes flavored with mango and calamansi.
Mango calamansi cheesecakes.
Esra Erol

Hood Famous co-owners Chera Amlag and Geo Quibuyen serve savory and sweet pastries, such as the classic and coconutty buko pie and the visually enticing ube cheesecake, made with purple yams, at their standout bakery. There are also savory baked goods and a coffee menu that includes lattes with ingredients like pandan and calamansi.

A tray of small cheescakes flavored with mango and calamansi.
Mango calamansi cheesecakes.
Esra Erol

Knee High Stocking Co

Knee High Stocking Co’s low-lit entrance near Denny Triangle.
The low-key entrance at Knee High Stocking Co.
Suzi Pratt

Knee High Stocking Co is a Filipino-owned speakeasy serving Prohibition-era cocktails and house-made shrubs, plus a menu of Filipino-inspired American food. Over drinks, Samuelsson shares a meal featuring dishes like pork adobo and arroz caldo.

Knee High Stocking Co’s low-lit entrance near Denny Triangle.
The low-key entrance at Knee High Stocking Co.
Suzi Pratt

Oriental Mart

The counter at Oriental Mart at Pike Place, with various hand-drawn signs displayed.
Oriental Mart has become a Pike Place icon.
Esra Erol

Chef and co-owner Leila Rosas runs Oriental Mart in Pike Place Market; the shop opened selling groceries in 1971 and added prepared foods later on. A true boss, Rosas has a simple setup, but her flavors are bold and complex. Be sure to try the salmon sinigang, the longganisa, and the chicken adobo.

The counter at Oriental Mart at Pike Place, with various hand-drawn signs displayed.
Oriental Mart has become a Pike Place icon.
Esra Erol

Musang

The lavender-painted exterior of Musang with the restaurant’s sign along the fence.
Musang took over the former Travelers Thali House in Beacon Hill.
Suzi Pratt

Chef Melissa Miranda’s longtime pop-up, Musang, now has a permanent home. The restaurant opened in early January; read more on Eater Seattle and catch Miranda talking about her restaurant and showing Samuelsson around the city on this episode of No Passport Required.

The lavender-painted exterior of Musang with the restaurant’s sign along the fence.
Musang took over the former Travelers Thali House in Beacon Hill.
Suzi Pratt

Fou Lee Market

The sign outside Fou Lee Market & Deli with the grocery’s name in bold red letters.
Fou Lee Market is a staple for Filipino groceries.
Suzi Pratt

Fou Lee in Beacon Hill is the go-to market for people who want to stock their ingredients with Filipino ingredients. Find fermented fish sauce, shrimp, packaged goods, and prepared dishes including ube pastries and dinuguan, a pork blood stew.

The sign outside Fou Lee Market & Deli with the grocery’s name in bold red letters.
Fou Lee Market is a staple for Filipino groceries.
Suzi Pratt

Archipelago

The exterior of Archipelago with the restaurant’s name on the green-trimmed door.
Archipelago specializes in Filipino fine dining.
Suzi Pratt

All the ingredients at Hillman City’s tasting-menu spot Archipelago are sourced from the Pacific Northwest. As chef and co-owner Aaron Verzosa says, the ethos behind the restaurant comes from answering the question, “Can I find the taste of what I grew up with in ingredients that are not used in Filipino cuisine?” He and co-owner Amber Manuguid categorize Archipelago as “Pacific Northwest progressive Filipino American cuisine.”

Samuelsson tries a pandesal made with Washington wheat and served with shallot butter and caviar from Idaho; kinilaw, a ceviche made with steelhead and served in a presentation that honors local cannery workers; and Oregon king salmon sinigang, among other dishes.

The exterior of Archipelago with the restaurant’s name on the green-trimmed door.
Archipelago specializes in Filipino fine dining.
Suzi Pratt

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